The Custom Furniture Business: Creating Beautiful and Timeless Designs
Small businesses are the soul of America

More people are interested in buying locally made products than ever before. You can capitalize on many consumers’ return to local shopping by emphasizing that all components of your furniture are made in the United States, or in your town or area. The same applies to handmade goods. Individuals who are tired of mass-produced goods are often the same people who are interested in buying locally. Given this climate, it is a good time to start a handmade furniture business.

And it’s now for sale

Not quite a house, not quite a hut, this pavilion designed by Anders Hermansen defies easy definition. The Danish designer built the tiny dwelling ten years ago as a roaming art piece that could be installed in different locations. Now, the design is on the market for approximately $38,000.

Wooden hut in a fieldAdam Schnack via The Spaces

At 96 square feet, the one-room hut is rather cozy and what it lacks in size, it makes up for in rustic charm. The frame is built from aged wood that looks like it could’ve been ripped from an old ship and rehabilitated to its perfectly shabby-chic condition. In fact, the wooden beds the hut sits on top of were actually taken from reclaimed construction from Copenhagen’s South Harbor.

Interior of wooden hutAdam Schnack via The Spaces

Hermansen designed the hut to take advantage of the outdoors. Two of the hut’s walls are built from doors that swing open to the outside. Another wall is a full pane of glass, which turns out to be a fine substitute for fresh air on rainy days.

Via: The Spaces

Everybody needs a little help sometimes 

Embarking on a home renovation project is no easy feat, but thanks to today's advances in internet technology, there is probably a stellar app out there ready to assist with every part of the process.

Below, we rounded up 15 standouts across three categories—plan, design, and expert help—available on iOS and/or Android, many of which are free to download. And if you need to declutter first, check out our roundup of the best apps and sites for selling old stuff around the house.

Plan

1. Home Design 3D: For drawing rooms, testing out furniture all in one app (some features like saving designs and 3D-viewing require upgrades.)

Free on iOS, Android

Home Design 3D.

2. Roomscan Pro: For creating floor plans just by touching your phone to each wall or by scanning the floor with your phone camera (iOS 11 only).

Free on iOS

3. magicplan: For creating floor plans from photos of a room.

Free on iOS, Android

4. Photo Measures: For saving measurements directly on your own photos.

$6.99 on iOS, $4.99 on Android

Photo Measures.

5. Handymobi: For organizing home improvement projects, browsing and sharing DIY project ideas; a free toolbox...

From wreaths to festive lights

Everyone is familiar with the standard holiday home decorations, from twinkling lights to menorahs and Christmas trees. But what if you’re living on the road, either in a van, an Airstream, or any other type of RV? Can you still make the holidays feel festive in less than 200 square feet? Love campers and trailers? Come join our community group.

We believe the answer is yes. You might need to opt for a smaller tree and be thoughtful of securing certain decorations, but it’s possible to embrace the holiday cheer even in a home-on-the-go. We’ve turned to Instagram to round up our favorite camper-oriented holiday inspiration, with an eye for unique and innovative ideas. Here are the best ideas for decorating your camper for the holidays.

Let’s start with the most basic: A picture-perfect wreath on the front of your camper.

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Or you can go more colorful with battery powered lights on the wreath.

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Large windows look out onto vast stone terraces

Have a nomination for a jaw-dropping listing that would make a mighty fine House of the Day? Get thee to the tipline and send us your suggestions. We’d love to see what you’ve got.

Location: Kansas City, Missouri

Price: $1,650,000

In 1939, Dr. & Mrs. Clarence Sondern commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to build a 900-square-foot home in the heart of Kansas City. Almost ten years later, the second owners asked the famous architect to expand the home to its current 2,965 square feet. Now, the property—which is one of only two Wright homes in Kansas City—is on the market.

The three-bedroom, three-bath Sondern-Adler house uses a combination of cypress and brick for the exterior and boasts interior in-floor heating. The Usonian home was originally designed as an L-shaped building with two wings connected by three squares that included a workspace, laundry and heater room, and bathroom.

The 1948 addition added another bedroom, living spaces, and a carport, but maintained the home’s large windows and doors that open out onto three vast stone terrace. Other architectural attributes are classic Usonian, including the home’s flat roof,...

Median listing prices have dropped, sales prices could follow

The West Coast has been home to some of the hottest housing markets in the country over the last five years, with Denver, San Francisco, San Jose, Los Angeles, and Seattle leading the way in home price appreciation.

But various pieces of housing data in the fall started indicating that maybe home prices had finally been pushed beyond people’s capacity to pay. First, homes started lingering on the market longer. Then the number of homes on the market started spiking dramatically. Throw in an increase in the number of price concessions, and it looked more and more like price drops are next.

And now, new data from Realtor.com offers the clearest sign yet that home price relief might finally be on the way for prospective homebuyers on the West Coast. Median listings prices—which is the middle price of all the real estate listings currently for sale—in markets across California, Colorado, Washington, and Oregon saw year-over-year declines in November, and when listings prices are lower, sale prices usually follow suit.

The largest active listings median price drop in November came in Denver, where the drop was just shy...

A class-action complaint claims it violates privacy rights

A class-action complaint filed this week in Seattle argues that the city’s mandatory rental inspection program, a proactive system meant to catch violations, violates constitutional rights to privacy.

The complaint, filed by lawyers from the public interest law firm Institute for Justice (IFJ) on Tuesday, argues the city’s Rental Registration and Inspection Ordinance violates the privacy enshrined in the U.S. and Washington constitutions, specifically Article I, § 7, which states that “No person shall be disturbed in his private affairs, or his home invaded, without authority of law.” Inspectors should be required to get a warrant or a tenant’s consent to enter a private residence.

Run through the city’s Department of Construction and Inspections (SDCI), the system cycles through the city’s entire rental stock every 10 years, checking units in all rental buildings at random. Inspectors in the program do not obtain warrants, or require a suspicion of wrongdoing or violations; they have the authority to enter and check for violations in at least 20 percent of the units in each building, using a 12-page checklist when...

How Santa Monica, the birthplace of dockless electric scooters, is shaping the multibillion-dollar industry

A year ago, a warehouse filled with rows of electric scooters might have seemed a little dorky, maybe home to a company trying to show fanny pack-wearing tourists local landmarks. But today, in Santa Monica, California, an old industrial space filled with hundreds of electric scooters with purple and pink stripes represents one of the hottest innovations in urban transportation.

Lyft set up this operations center as part of its bet that the future of the company involves replacing lots of car trips with rides on electric scooters and electric bikes. Eventually, a Lyft spokesperson told me, the idea is to create a “Netflix of transportation,” offering scooter, e-bike, and car rides with a single subscription, as well as guidance to link trips to public transit.

A late entrant into the dockless scooter craze, Lyft is doing its best to catch up. This facility is the first of what the company, valued at $15 billion, expects will be a string of scooter depots, repair and recovery operations for the company’s foray into micromobility. As a participant in Santa Monica’s

Terrazzo gets an eco-friendly update

Here at Curbed, we’re not immune to the charms of terrazzo, the suddenly ubiquitous material made from chunks of marble or stone set into concrete. From trendy restaurants to high-design apartments, the material is in the midst a serious comeback.

Black and white terrazzo slabAltrock

With terrazzo’s reemergence on the design world stage, there’s been some intriguing innovation in the centuries-old material-making process, which typically requires manually placing marble chippings in a pattern before casting them in concrete.

Green and white terrazzo slabAltrock

Meet Altrock, a new marble-based surface material from London designer Robin Grasby. Altrock terrazzos are made from a combination of stone waste products like marble flour, marble chips, and broken pieces from marble slabs sourced from interior projects. These materials are mixed with a bit of resin and then hand-casted into slabs that can be used for new products like tables, flooring, and countertops. Design-wise, Grasby opted for a “beautifully chaotic appearance” in which no two slabs are the same, rather than putting in place carefully arranged stone patterns.

Gray and white terrazzo slabAltrock

Though Altrock is simply terrazzo by another name,...

Vehicles stand in a traffic jam near the France-Luxembourg border in Zoufftgen, eastern France on early August 2, 2018, as people are on their way to work.

A plan to reduce traffic and help the environment

Urban traffic is an ongoing problem for many of the world’s cities. On an individual level, traffic is frustrating. But collectively, cars in jam-packed streets contribute to increased air pollution and exhaust that has been linked to an estimated three million deaths every year caused by air pollution.

Such sobering statistics have caused cities like London, Paris, and Seoul to double-down on car-free policies, including things like price congestion, car-free areas, the banning of diesel vehicles, and policies that would create more bike and pedestrian friendly cities.

Just recently, one of the smallest countries in the world has promised a new solution: Free mass transit for all. According to the New York Times, Luxembourg’s Prime Minister Xavier Bettel announced the plan when he was sworn in for a second term this past Wednesday. Bettel campaigned on a platform that prioritized the environment.

Free mass transit will be available in Luxembourg beginning in 2020, and will apply to all trains, trams, and buses. Some cities in Europe—like Tallinn, the capital of Estonia—have introduced similar programs in an effort to reduce...

Plenty of wall space included

Have a nomination for a jaw-dropping listing that would make a mighty fine House of the Day? Get thee to the tipline and send us your suggestions. We’d love to see what you’ve got.

Location: Dallas, Texas

Price: $1,065,000

For art lovers, a house isn’t just a house—it’s a blank canvas. Take This Bud Oglesby-designed stunner in Dallas, which is filled with ample opportunities for showcasing art of all kinds.

Now on the market for $1.065M, the 1978 design has luxe touches including white brick walls, refinished wood floors, and floor-to-ceiling windows.

Walking in the front door, you’re welcomed into a cavernous open-plan living space with soaring ceilings and large white walls that span the room with plenty of space to hang art. A stylish steel staircase leads upstairs to a glassy bridge that overlooks the dining room.

 Photo by Stephen Reed courtesy of Sotheby’s
 Photo by Stephen Reed courtesy of Sotheby’s

At 2,644 square feet, the house dedicates most of its space to the living area, though it boasts two large bedrooms with walk-in closets and a spacious master bathroom. Downstairs, the rear of the house offers another winning moment, where...

Call it the Fixer Upper effect

I was late to the Fixer Upper party. Of course, I’d heard about the show and its hosts, Chip and Joanna Gaines, but I didn’t catch on to what a big deal the show was until well into its run. When I finally hunkered down to watch some episodes, I was intrigued by the fact that these people were decking out house after house in one particular style—often a perplexing choice for the homes’ architecture—so that they all looked the same. What I didn’t know was that this look had a name, and it would become the decorating trend du jour: The now-ubiquitous “modern farmhouse” look.


A decade ago the phrase “modern farmhouse” would perhaps have referred to a newly built actual farmhouse, but today it conjures a checklist of decor elements that add up to something a little bit country, a little bit industrial, and a whole lot of white paint. Shiplap paneling? Check. Reclaimed wood? Check. White walls and wide planked floors? Check, check. A few vintage accessories, an apron sink, and some barn-style lighting? Check, check, check. The look is so predictable, it’s formulaic.

What is surprising is that such a readily recognizable look is just a few years old....

Former J.Crew designer Frank Muytjens turns a fantasy into reality

Welcome back to Period Dramas, a column that celebrates all things old houses.

Frank Muytjens isn’t afraid to reinvent himself. After nearly 10 years at the helm of menswear design for J.Crew, Muytjens left the brand in April of 2017, prompting many in the fashion industry to wonder what his next step would be.

It turns out, it wouldn’t be in fashion—or even in New York City. Muytjens traded his Brooklyn apartment for country life when he moved to the scenic Berkshires region in western Massachusetts and renovated an 18th-century house into a boutique hotel: The Inn at Kenmore Hall.

“Opening an inn was always a fantasy of mine,” says Muytjens. After he moved to his house in upstate New York in June of 2017, he and his partner, artist and entrepreneur Scott Edward Cole, began to seriously brainstorm about making the dream a reality.

“I knew I wanted to buy an older house,” adds Muytjens. “It’s similar to what I was interested in doing at J.Crew with fashion. We were always looking for a great story—a great history. It adds depth to what you’re doing.”

They found the house that would later become the inn...

California-based ModVans builds a camper with seating for five and removable RV components.

A new crowdfunding campaign lets you invest in the company

For many people aspiring to own a camper van, one of the greatest challenges is how the van can function as both a daily driver and a weekend getaway. It can be financially impractical to own a second or third vehicle, and the brilliance of a Class B van is that there’s the possibility that it can perform double duty. Love campers and trailers? Come join our new community group.

In reality, however, it’s hard to find a modular van that can sleep a family on vacation and still safely haul everyone to soccer practice during the week. California-based ModVans offers an innovative solution to this problem. We covered ModVans in the past when its signature camper van was in the design stage, and now the company has debuted a production model—called the CV1—that looks to capitalize on its initial success.

The big difference between ModVans and its competitors is that in order to fund its expansion, ModVans is selling stock via a regulation crowdfunding campaign. It’s a bit like a Kickstarter campaign, but instead of buying a product, investors purchase stock—or equity—in the company during an online public offering.

The

Not everyone’s sold

The mood around Nashville last week was one of celebration mixed with relief. The city got something from Amazon—a promised 5,000 jobs—but escaped the logistical nightmare of an official designation as the company’s second headquarters, with its estimated 50,000 positions.

Gov. Bill Haslam called the news a “game changer,” and Nashville Mayor David Briley said the announcement “further underscores our city’s vibrancy.”

Still, one couldn’t help noting the irony of the news that the tech company will occupy an office tower on the former site of LifeWay Christian Resources, the publishing arm of the Southern Baptist Convention—which downsized to smaller offices thanks in no small part to Amazon’s cannibalization of book sales.

The replacement of an office tower prominently sporting a giant cross, now imploded, with Nashville Yards—a planned massive complex of office space, apartments, a luxury hotel, dining, retail, a movie theater, a concert venue, an upscale bowling alley, and possibly thousands of West Coast transplants—couldn’t be a more on-the-nose metaphor for the changes and challenges facing Nashville.

 Courtesy of Nashville Yards
A rendering...

This <a class="ql-link" href="https://amzn.to/2DweItZ" target="_blank" data-author="-1"> midcentury-style sofa</a> is on sale for <span data-author="-1">$279.99 (usually $429)</span> .

Save on smart home devices, furniture, and more

Black Friday is the biggest shopping holiday of the year so it makes sense that the internet’s biggest retailer is pulling out all the stops. Amazon has begun rolling out its Black Friday deals and while there’s a focus on Amazon’s own products (including Echo devices of course), there are also tons of discounts on other furniture and decor to browse.

We’re rounding up the best of Amazon’s Black Friday home deals below and will continue to update this page throughout Black Friday weekend, on to Cyber Monday and beyond. The deals below are available now unless otherwise noted, and more deals will drop throughout the week. Want more? Find our full list of Black Friday sales here.


Echo devices

Amazon’s smart home devices will be on sale starting 11/22 (Thanksgiving Day). Looking for more home tech deals? Head right this way.

  • Echo — $69 (usually $99)
  • Echo Dot — $24 (usually $49.99)
  • Echo Plus — $109.99 (usually $149.99)
  • Echo Spot — $89.99 (usually $129.99)
  • Echo Show — $179.99 (usually $229.99)

Furniture

Select furniture, mattresses, and rugs are discounted by up to 20 percent.

  • Jonathan Adler coffee table — $158.40 (usually...

The way we pay for our leaders to live in D.C. is inherently political

If you’ve spent any time scrolling through social media lately, you may have noticed a bit of consternation over a certain congresswoman-elect’s housing situation.

Earlier this month, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the forthcoming freshman representative from the Bronx, tweeted about her inability to afford housing in D.C. until her congressional salary kicks in—“I have three months without a salary before I’m a member of Congress. So, how do I get an apartment?”

Social media began churning out responses of outrage, sympathy, disbelief, genuine offers of help, and unfounded accusations.

Ocasio-Cortez was grandstanding. She was eliciting sympathy. She was lying. She was looking for handouts. Any and every idea has likely been floated as to why the youngest-ever member of Congress, who until very recently was working behind the bar at a small taqueria near Union Square, was discussing why she couldn’t immediately rent a place near her new job. (According to Zillow, the median rent in Washington, D.C., is $2,700.)

If conversation was her goal, mission accomplished.

Housing is political, especially during a...

The <a class="ql-link" href="https://www.wayfair.com/furniture/pdp/mistana-wasser-coffee-table-mtna5083.html?piid=31381144&amp;ds=143296" target="_blank">Wasser coffee table</a> is on sale for $119.06 (usually $269).

Save up to 80 percent off fun Wayfair finds

Black Friday is here and Wayfair isn’t waiting to start discounting hundreds of products from furniture and mattresses to rugs and wall art. The online retailer has launched a Black Friday hub where you can shop all things home.

Wayfair will be offering Black Friday deals of up to 80 percent off all week, with free shipping when you order between November 22 and November 26. It would be impossible to list all of Wayfair’s Black Friday deals here, but we’ve rounded up some of our favorites from the sale.

We’ll be updating this post all week as products sell out and prices change so be sure to check back as you do your furniture shopping this Black Friday weekend.

Looking for more deals? Check out our full list of Black Friday sales.


Furniture

  • Henley Manual Recliner — $165.99 (usually $334.99)
  • Barryknoll Chesterfield Settee — $281.99 (usually $1,299.99)
  • Carneal TV Stand — $108.07 (usually $370)
  • Wasser Coffee Table — $117.68 (usually $269)
  • Deandra Dining Chair (Set of 2) — $115.70 (usually $300)
  • Huckaby Blaxlands Sectional — $798.99 (usually $2,969.09)

Bedding

  • Wayfair Sleep Pillow Top Innerspring Mattress — starting at...

Interior Define’s <a class="ql-link" href="https://www.curbed.com/2018/6/12/17450298/custom-furniture-online-dining-interior-define" target="_blank">new customizable dining set</a> is included in the brand’s Black Friday promotions.

Holiday shopping season is here

Thanksgiving is almost here and Black Friday promotions are already well underway. As in past years, Curbed will be tracking the best sales and deals on furniture, decor, bedding, home tech, and more. This time around, they’ll be broken down by category for your shopping convenience.

This post will be updated throughout in the coming week as more deals are announced, so be sure to check back. Looking for smart home tech deals? Head right this way.


Furniture and decor

AHAlife: Take 20 percent off sitewide with code KARMA—$5 from every purchase will be donated to the California Fire Foundation to benefit victims of wildfire in California.

AllModern: Get 70 percent off select items (plus free shipping) from 11/17 through 11/21 at the pre-sale and take an extra 20 percent off select items with code ACTNOW from 11/22 4 pm ET through 11/26. Look out for 6-hour flash sales from 11/22 through 11/27.

Armadillo & Co: Take 20 percent off all rugs (handmade in India and designed in Australia) from 11/20 through 11/24.

Article: The furniture retailer is hosting its biggest Black Friday Sale ever with discounts of up to 60 percent off over 300 items from...

Google Home.

Save on all things smart home this Black Friday

The biggest shopping holiday of the year, Black Friday, is here. This is no doubt one of the best times to snag some smart home tech, either as a gift or to add to your own lineup.

You can expect deals on smart home hubs and speakers—the most popular being Google Home and Amazon Echo. Plenty of smart thermostats, security cameras, and doorbells will also be discounted.

We’ll be updating this post throughout Black Friday weekend with all things smart home, so be sure to check back. Want more deals for the home? Head over to our ongoing roundup of the best Black Friday sales on furniture, bedding, and more.

Note: All of the deals below start on November 22 unless otherwise noted.


Amazon Echo deals

  • Echo: Amazon’s flagship smart home device will be on sale for $69 (usually $99).
  • Echo Dot: The smaller Echo model will be on sale for $24 (usually $49.99).
  • Echo Plus: Amazon’s smart speaker with a smart home hub built-in will be on sale for $109.99 (usually $149.99).
  • Echo Spot: The Echo with a small screen will be on sale for $89.99 (usually $129.99).
  • Echo Show: A larger screen model will be on sale for $179.99 (usually $229.99).

An A-frame available for vacation rentals in Yosemite, California.

It’s an A-frame state of mind

Ah, the A-frame. You might remember the quirky triangular structures from vacations of yore, full of shag carpet and tiny lofts cramped with beds. But thanks to Instagram, nostalgia, and the allure of a certain way of life, the A-frame is back and better than ever.

From coast to coast, entrepreneurial property owners are renovating—and sometimes even building—A-frames in order to rent them to architecture-loving vacationers. Often set in forests and always boasting the required front deck and the signature tall roofs, these A-frames cater to people who want a bit of style with their travel.

We’ve combed rental listings from across the country to bring you ten stunning A-frames you can rent right now. Know of one we missed? Tell us in the comments.

A newly renovated A-frame in New Jersey

 Photo by Michael James Murray, courtesy of Lokal A Frame
An A-frame in Dorchester, New Jersey run by the Lokal Hotel.

Less than one hour from Philadelphia, this three-bedroom, two-bath boutique A-frame by Stay Lokal has undergone a top-to-bottom renovation and comes with Scandinavian and modern interiors. It’s also located on the Maurice River for easy...

Online property management tools are moving the landlord-tenant relationship to the internet

Gino Zahnd was searching for an apartment in San Francisco when he noticed his credit score had unexpectedly dropped. Given the rental market in the Bay Area is ultra-competitive, he knew this could end up costing him an apartment and prolong his apartment hunt.

But even more frustrating than the score drop itself was the reason why it dropped: It wasn’t anything he did. Instead, a landlord had accidentally run a hard credit report—which can signal to lenders that a borrower is trying to open new accounts—six times by repeatedly refreshing a web browser when the initial submission didn’t immediately load.

“It pissed me off enough to think: ‘there’s gotta be a better way to start a relationship with a stranger than by handing them a packet of paper that has literally everything they need for identity theft,’” Zahnd said. “In San Francisco, you might do that half a dozen times before you actually get a place. You start wondering what all these people are doing with all that information.”

The experience ended up being the genesis of Cozy, one of a number of new online property management...

The “basement” gets plenty of sunlight

Here at Curbed, we appreciate a well-designed concrete home, and this Tel Aviv house is no exception. Designed by Israeli architect Asaf Gottesman with help from Tel Aviv firm GSArch, the Postscript House is Gottesman’s first residential project in more than a decade and he made up for lost time with a stunner of a residence that’s deceptively simple.

Designed for a family with four children, the Postscript House is equal parts practical and ingenious. The architects built the house into the landscape’s gentle slope, which allowed them to play with perspective. From the west, the house appears to be a single floor. Viewed from the east, it reveals a second lower story that looks out onto the garden.

Concrete house with pink trees in frontPhoto by Omri Amsalem courtesy Gottesman Architecture
Dining room with glowing lightPhoto by Omri Amsalem courtesy Gottesman Architecture

The home unfolds on two levels, with the main floor playing host to the living room and master bedroom. Downstairs, each of the kids gets a bedroom suite that looks out onto the garden.

Living room sofaPhoto by Omri Amsalem courtesy Gottesman Architecture

The architects kept the house intentionally minimal with a stark light interior that...

The sunken spa is a unique feature

Have a nomination for a jaw-dropping listing that would make a mighty fine House of the Day? Get thee to the tipline and send us your suggestions. We’d love to see what you’ve got.

Location: Sacramento, California

Price: $809,000

One of the most enduring qualities of midcentury design is how often the interiors can surprise. From the street, many midcentury homes appear long and even at times boring; on the inside, however, light-filled rooms and post-and-beam ceilings make you look twice.

Take this four-bedroom, three-bath in Sacramento, California—a home highlighted in the Sacramento Bee in 1974. The exterior looks inviting, but inside the 3,298 square foot structure is where this home really shines. The focal point is a circular “Roman” atrium that functions as a central cathedral-ceiling courtyard with cement floors. Instead of a traditional Roman pool to catch rain water, the original owners installed a sunken hot tub and the main living room, dining room, and kitchen all surround it.

The atrium’s large windows at either end flood the interior with light and the bedrooms all have sliding glass doors that provide access to the...

Austin approved new funding last night for walking and biking infrastructure like the city’s Pfluger Pedestrian Bridge.

Voters approve measures to boost public transit—and candidates who pledge to improve how they get around

Two years ago, voters across the country approved dozens of major transportation measures funneling billions of dollars into transit infrastructure projects.

While there weren’t quite as many major transit-related referendums on ballots last night, some notable measures to fund transportation saw big wins, including several victorious candidates who made transportation a key part of their platforms.

Governors make transportation a priority

Several governors who won decisively last night campaigned on promises to bring better transit to their constituents. But none more effectively than Michigan’s gubernatorial candidate Gretchen Whitmer, who ran on the platform “Fix the Damn Roads” (which she later revised to “Fix the Roads,” due to FCC concerns).

Beyond simply addressing the state’s crumbling and pothole-ridden streets, Whitmer’s pledge is part of a comprehensive infrastructure plan she has laid out for the state that includes a big push for public transit, including reviving Detroit’s failed regional plan, which did not get placed on the 2018 ballot, and an overhaul of...

Sometimes you just want to let some things go.

Or scoring a bargain on something you actually want

When it comes to buying and selling used stuff on the internet, eBay and Craigslist probably come to mind immediately. But in the age of shiny websites and apps galore, there are more options than ever to help you score a bargain or offload used goods around the house, from decor and kitchenware to appliances and furniture.

We searched high and low to identify the most promising platforms for buying and selling old furniture and home goods. Some are turnkey services that will handle pick up and delivery. Others leave you to make arrangements with buyers or sellers directly—be sure to exercise caution in these cases. Here they are listed by alphabetical order (after numbers).

1stdibs

A go-to marketplace for luxury antique and vintage finds, 1stdibs is where you can nab rare home furnishings designed by the likes of Gio Ponti, George Nakashima, and Aino Alto. The site only allows vetted, professional sellers to list items for sale.

iOS

5miles

Like a streamlined, Pinterest-fied Craigslist, this mobile-focused service lets you buy and sell locally using your phone’s GPS location. Sellers snap a picture and enter a description...

Soup never looked so good

Every generation gets the Dutch oven it deserves (that’s how the saying goes, right?), and in 2018, that Dutch oven is Great Jones. Started by food writer Sierra Tishgart and Maddy Moelis, a former product manager at Zola, Great Jones is unabashedly gunning for food-minded—and aesthetics-minded—millennials with its new set of cookware basics.

The company is officially launching today, but you might have already seen it around on social media, thanks to its photogenic wares. The full line includes a series of just-shiny-enough silver pots and pans, but the star of the show is the Dutchess, a 6.76-quart Dutch oven that comes in a rainbow of colors.

Pink dutch ovenGreat Jones
Blue dutch oven

The on-trend hues include cobalt blue, sunshine yellow, a forest green (the official color of the summer camp where the two founders first met), and—you guessed it—a very pleasing shade of millennial pink. There’s also a lovely and practical gray option in the mix, which was suggested by one of the founder’s mothers.

Looks aside, the wares incorporate some clever design gestures: The stainless-steel pieces all nest, four of the pieces share two lids, and the interiors are rivetless to...

‘Tis the season of giving

Sometimes selling used home goods you no longer want makes sense and sometimes it doesn’t. Perhaps the current market value of the items isn’t worth the effort or you just don’t feel like dealing with strangers, yet the products are still perfectly functional and it would be nice (and sustainable) to find them a new home. These are the times to look into donating.

Below, we’ve rounded up various channels for donating household items, from furniture banks to charity shops. Before donating, take care to accurately assess the condition of your items (consider checking with the organization first to make sure they’re in acceptable condition) and note that some buildings may require a certificate of insurance if movers will be coming in to transport larger items. And when donating to charities, don’t forget to get a receipt to claim a tax deduction.

The following resources, listed alphabetically, accept household items, furniture, and appliances of all sizes unless otherwise noted.

Furniture banks

With locations across the U.S. and Canada, furniture banks collect gently used furniture and household items and distribute them to families in need for...

In Philadelphia, the architecture firm ISA looks for ways new housing can address other equity challenges, like public health, access to open space, and emotional well-being. Its Powerhouse project, a 31-unit infill development completed in 2014, includes the “super stoops” and street furniture that encourage social engagement among neighbors and passersby.

Hint: It’s all about housing

Today, nowhere is immune to housing crises: Developed and developing nations; cities, suburbs, and rural areas; prosperous regions and economically struggling ones. And there’s a common refrain echoing around the world: housing is a human right. However, that’s far from being a reality. How—in the face of considerable population, financial, regulatory, and spatial hurdles—can we boost supply to those who need it and do it in a considered, successful way?

“Housing as Intervention: Architecture towards Social Equity,” a recent volume of Architectural Design, explains how architects around the world are responding to social equity and justice issues through housing. Guest editor and housing expert Karen Kubey scoured the globe to find forward-thinking solutions that are specific to the problems in their respective cities, but hold lessons for architects everywhere.

 Urbanus Architecture & Design Inc.
Urbanus—a firm in Shenzhen, China—is researching ways to develop housing in an inclusive way. Its Baishizhou Five Villages Urban Regeneration research in Shenzhen, from 2013, is based on the existing urban village layout, which the developer had...

Eero Saarinen, with his ever-present pipe, working with Kevin Roche at Saarinen and Associates in 1953.

Kevin Roche, Robert Venturi, Gunnar Birkerts, and even Balthazar Korab worked for the influential modern architect

Kevin Roche remembers his initial interview with Eero Saarinen in 1950. The young architect, having spent the last week drinking and partying in New York City, had been summoned by the famous Finnish-American designer for an 8 a.m. meeting in his room at the Plaza Hotel to talk about a potential job.

Saarinen, who was just getting up, began talking in his slow, deliberate voice at Roche, who had been up all night with his cousin and slowly drifted off into sleep. Saarinen evidently didn’t notice, continuing his discussion about architecture and design. As Roche told Dwell, he eventually woke up with a start as Saarinen said “well, come out to Michigan.” Roche would then borrow some cash, buy an overnight train ticket, and begin working for Saarinen the next day.

Roche had the luck to not only ace the interview, but become a designer, architect, and eventually key associate at one of the more exciting architecture offices of the 20th century. Eero Saarinen and Associates of Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, would go on to design some of the most iconic buildings of...

I just finished this dresser and mirror for a little girl’s room.  The color they chose was Annie Sloan Napoleonic Blue. I was happy to give this set a pop of color!  To see this shade of blue plus other Annie Sloan colors, please click HERE. The issue I had was that the set had...

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Subway Tile with Natural Gray Grout

A quick update on our mini kitchen DIY renovation, and in particular the subway tile backsplash.  This is a great example of a true snowball effect! It all began when I decided to repaint my cabinets white.  I began the job by having Benjamin Moore Cloud White color matched at Home Depot.  The paint was...

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Hey everyone!  I have been super sick this week with a really bad cold and as soon as I recovered, I was hit with a bad case of food poisoning – yikes!  This is why I’m sharing this week’s makeover on a Friday instead of in the middle of the week. – a poor excuse...

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The Free Bird from Washington-based Caravan Outfitters brings an affordable camper van option to the masses.

It’s a daily driver and camper in one

The allure of #VanLife is strong, from the nomadic lifestyle to the ability to camp wherever, whenever. But although it seems like everyone wants a camper van these days, it’s not always practical for some people. Love campers and trailers? Come join our community group.

More than anything, most camper vans are expensive. Custom conversion rigs regularly run into six figures, and Class Bs from industry veterans like Winnebago and Airstream are top-dollar, too. It can also be hard to add another vehicle into the mix, and most camper vans don’t function as a daily driver.

Throw in height restrictions, HOA requirements, and storage space, and it’s easy to see while the #VanLife dream remains out of reach to many. Too often, the affordable, modular camper vans so common in Europe just don’t seem to be available here.

New companies want to change that. We’ve reported on the Recon camper van in the past, and today we’re looking at the Free Bird from Washington-based Caravan Outfitter. Built on the Nissan NV200 cargo van, the Free Bird uses a convenient slide-rail system that makes switching from camper van to cargo hauler a cinch.

 Photos...

Currently on display at Dutch Design Week

Throughout his career, Dutch designer Joris Laarman has pushed the boundaries of what’s possible with a 3D printer. Best known for his Bone Chair, Laarman is a pro experimenter with process and form.

Since 2015, Laarman has been working on his most ambitious project yet—a 40-foot 3D-printed steel bridge that will span an Amsterdam canal. Now, nearly four years after he started the project, the bridge is fully printed and ready to install.

Steel bridge on displayPhoto by Adriaan de Groot via Dezeen

Working with his 3D printing company, MX3D, Laarman and his team designed a six-axis robot capable of 3D printing a swooping load-bearing structure from molten steel. The bridge itself is an impressive feat of technology, starting with its complex form, which was printed in chunks before being welded together.

3D printed steel bridgePhoto by Adriaan de Groot via Dezeen

It’s also embedded with sensors that can collect data around the bridge’s health. In real time, the bridge can measure strain and vibration as well as the number of people who walk over it and how quickly. MX3D says it’s using this first bridge as a way to collect data that will inform future bridge designs. The...

In the market for something new at home? Check these out

Your home should ideally put you at ease—and the right furniture and decor can help. The only problem? Finding joy-sparking pieces that are also durable and wallet-friendly is easier said than done.

That’s why we’ve put together the following shoppable roundups across popular home goods categories—from sofas and ottomans to rugs and accent chairs—all at relatively affordable price points. Click through to each category for all of our picks and for even more ideas, make sure to check out our spring Home Shopping Guide.

Sofas under $1,500

Madeline Sleeper Sofa, $749, Urban Outfitters.

Dining tables under $1000

Fuze Grey Dining Table, $999, CB2.

Small dining tables under $500

Box Frame Drop Leaf Expandable Table. $499, West Elm.

Consoles under $400

Peekaboo Acrylic Media Console, $399, CB2.

Coffee tables under $300

Stockholm Nesting Tables, $279, Ikea.

Ottomans under $200

Beryl Green Marcelle Tufted Ottoman, $99, World Market.

Beds under $1,000

Belham Living Harper King Bed, $279.99, Hayneedle.

Accent chairs under $600

Langley Street Barrel Chair, $133.99, Wayfair.

Rugs under $500

8’ x 10’ Stone & Beam...

Scooter parking was introduced in the city of Santa Monica to keep the electric vehicles out of the right of way.

Scooter companies are accused of “gross negligence” and “abetting assault” in a complaint filed in Los Angeles court

The two largest scooter companies in the U.S. are named as part of a class-action lawsuit filed Friday, where nine plaintiffs claim they or their properties have been injured or harmed by Bird and Lime scooters as a result of “gross negligence.”

The complaint, which was filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court and has been obtained by Curbed, includes not just scooter riders but pedestrians who say they have sustained injuries which include broken wrists, toes, and fingers, torn ligaments, face lacerations, and “damaged” teeth.

“We filed this class-action lawsuit against Bird and Lime and the manufacturers of their electric scooters to address the terrible injuries they have inflicted on their riders and pedestrians, and the continuing harm they are causing,” Santa Monica personal-injury lawyer Catherine Lerer told Peter Holley, who broke the news of the suit in the Washington Post.

Lerer said she has received over 100 calls from people injured by the dockless mobility devices. Her firm, McGee, Lerer & Associates, has a page on its website dedicated to...

1970s vibes in full effect

Have a nomination for a jaw-dropping listing that would make a mighty fine House of the Day? Get thee to the tipline and send us your suggestions. We’d love to see what you’ve got.

Location: Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Price: $765,000

If unique design inspires you, look no further than this towering five-bedroom, five-bath home in North Carolina. Custom built in 1975 for Winston-Salem resident Dr. John Hayes, the multi-level house was inspired by the “binuclear design” made famous by modernist architect and designer Marcel Breuer.

The binuclear layout features two separate wings with an entry hall at the nucleus, a way to organize the home’s sprawling 5,703 square feet. Renovations in 2013 updated and repaired problem areas, but left the house’s original California redwood paneling, imperial plaster walls, and oak parquet floors.

The building sits on 1.1 acres in the prime Winston-Salem neighborhood of Buena Vista, and also boasts a large master suite, wet bar, and a study with 12-foot ceilings and built-in bookcases. Outside, brick-terraced landscaping compliments a waterfall, pond, and extensive greenery, making this redwood giant look a bit...

The Summit by Colorado Teardrops boasts a unique interior cabin that includes a bunkbed for kids.

Burly enough to go off-road

There’s a lot to love about the teardrop trailer. Even the tiniest of teardrops usually feature swooping classic lines, compact and functional design, and a reasonable price tag that looks downright affordable compared to other campers. Love campers and trailers? Come join our community group.

We’ve written about some of our favorite teardrops in the past, but the latest to cross our desk is Colorado Teardrops. Based in Boulder and founded in 2014, Colorado Teardrops currently builds four different models of trailers designed to get you camping quickly.

If teardrop trailers have any drawbacks, it’s that it can be hard to sleep a family. Most teardrops sleep two adults in the main cabin, although some add a rooftop tent in order to sleep a few more. But what’s a family with two small kiddos to do?

Enter the Summit. The Colorado Teardrop Summit model is 5 feet by 10.5 feet and boasts a dry weight of about 1630 pounds. The fully insulated trailer features an anodized aluminum exterior and light maple plywood on the interior for a woodsy, cozy feel. But the coolest thing about the Summit is the sleeping set up: The trailer cabin includes bunk beds...

The government has ordered the pilot program be stopped immediately

Updated: On October 19, the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) issued a statement saying it has directed Transdev North America to immediately stop running its Babcock Ranch autonomous school shuttles, calling the pilot program “unlawful and in violation of the company’s temporary importation authorization.” NHTSA says the Transdev shuttle was approved for “a specific demonstration project, not as a school bus.” While Transdev said it believed the program did meet NHTSA’s approval requirements, the company has voluntarily shut down the project.

The southwestern Florida town of Babcock Ranch bills itself as the nation’s first solar-powered town. Now, it can add another big high-tech notch to its belt: The first city to test autonomously driving school shuttle buses.

This fall, the planned community has partnered with Transdev to launch a pilot program for self-driving shuttle buses that can transport up to 12 children at a time.

Like other autonomous shuttles that are popping up across the country, the EasyMile Easy10 Gen II is pod-like vehicle that runs...

Columbus launches new downtown driverless transit trial

In Columbus, Ohio, a group of small, autonomous shuttle buses circling downtown offers a glimpse of what some tech and transit advocates see as a key component of future urban transportation.

Operated by Michigan-based startup May Mobility, the three shuttles have been running a test route on a roughly one-mile loop around the Scioto Mile, an area adjacent to a riverfront park, since last month. Currently operating in test mode—without passengers and with a backup driver—the shuttles will begin picking up riders on December 3. Moving at a steady 15 miles per hour, these vehicles show the slow but steady progress of this technology, billed as a potential solution to transit congestion in dense downtowns.

“We want this tech to be tested in all use cases, and know we can rely on it in all weather conditions,” says Jordan Davis, director of Smart Columbus, the smart city initiative helping oversee the trial. “We don’t want to launch something that leads to false hope.”

Run in partnership with the Ohio Department of Transportation’s DriveOhio initiative, this trial is a step toward Columbus realizing its ambitions to become a...

“If there’s a city of opportunity in Texas, it’s San Antonio.”

A 300-year-old capital of Latinx culture on the cusp of change

It’s the nation’s seventh most-populous city—and the fastest-growing one. It’s welcoming 66 new residents each day and is on pace to receive 1 million new arrivals in the next 25 years. Downtown, a $57 million, state-of-the art school of data science will soon open, one of a score of pivotal developments reshaping the city’s core.

Few would likely guess that the above refers to San Antonio, Texas, the state’s second-largest city—and one of the U.S.’s least understood. As this capital of Mexican-American culture celebrates its 300th birthday, it also confronts a sizable shift in its character, economy, and ambitions.

“Historically, [San Antonio is] a city that was isolated, small, and didn’t see a lot of growth,” says Ian Caine, an associate professor of architecture and director of the Center for Urban and Regional Planning Research at the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA). “You have a city that’s experiencing growth, but it’s not built for that.”

 UIG via Getty Images
The River Walk in San Antonio.

Caine describes San Antonio as a city of contrasting realities—especially now. Traditionally seen as...

Courtyard, but circular

There are a couple ways to approach a hot and humid climate: Either shut it out or embrace it fully. This house on Mexico’s western coast takes on both approaches and in the process creates a beautiful homage to the region’s balmy weather.

Mexican architecture firm Casas de Mexico (CDM) designed the house around a circular interior courtyard that’s filled with palm trees. According to Dezeen, the house sits on a former palm grove that was cleared to build the sprawling residence. What remains is a smaller but impeccably groomed yard landscaped with spindly palm trees, green grass, and a placid pool.

Circular courtyard with palm treesPhoto by Rory Gardiner and Lorena Darquea via Dezeen

“We almost wanted that patio to feel like a chunk of the surrounding jungle had been taken from its original place and relocated in the inside of this home, with its palm trees reaching to the sky,” the studio told Dezeen.

Bedroom with open sliding doorsPhoto by Rory Gardiner and Lorena Darquea via Dezeen

CDM’s design merges the interior with the exterior through oversized doors that slide open to the courtyard and open-air corridors that connect different wings of the house. It’s a lovely effect that makes the house feel breezy...

favorite find monday

Today’s find is a vintage chest of drawers that I am about to paint for a neighbor, Amantha.  This piece is part of her childhood bedroom set that has now been handed down to her daughter. Amantha already painted the matching vanity and dresser but ran out of time and energy.  I’m going to finish...

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Remember the HUGE Empire dresser that I purchased at a thrift store?  It was a real struggle to get this one home but I’m so glad I did.  I really had a lot of fun with this huge beast! This piece was not a custom job and it was liberating to choose whatever color I...

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I’ve finished the bedroom set in Paris Grey for a little girl’s room and with a lucky Target fluffy pillowcase find, the set is complete! Earlier this week I shared the Cottage Gray dresser that is part of this project and now am sharing the vanity. These pieces are not an actual bedroom set (see...

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Paris Grey Bedroom Dresser

I wasn’t able to share a Favorite Find with you this week because I’ve been flat out busy completing custom jobs and didn’t have a chance to go thrifting.  I will share this Cottage Gray dresser makeover that I just completed.  It was my favorite find Monday a few weeks ago. Here is the before:...

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Empire Dresser Makeover in Joanna Gaines Magnolia Home Paint

This week, I’m sharing a video tutorial I created on the process of transforming the “beast” Empire dresser!  I posted the “before and after” last week, and just finished editing the video tutorial and uploaded it to my YouTube channel.  Using Magnolia Home by Joanna Gaines chalk style paint in the color Olive Grove, the...

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The program uses “reminiscence therapy”

Inside a sprawling beige warehouse in Southern California is what some researchers believe could be the next big thing in dementia care. Town Square, a 9,000-square-foot replica of a 1950s-era town in Chula Vista, California, is designed to jog the memories of people with dementia by surrounding them with familiar places and activities from their past.

The replica, which is part of the George G. Glenner Alzheimer’s Family Center’s roster of adult day centers, is impressively detailed. The town has 14 storefronts including a vintage shop, movie theater playing old films, a working diner, and an old-school gas station, complete with a 1950s Thunderbird that visitors can sit inside. Patients rotate through each location and participate in activities based on their abilities.

 Courtesy of George G. Glenner Alzheimer’s Family Centers

The whole thing is designed to get patients moving around and socializing with each other. “Every storefront lends itself to reminiscing,” Scott Tarde, CEO of the Glenner Centers, told CityLab. “In the library, they’ll do everything from puzzles to having storytellers come in. In the pet store, animal...

It’s pretty darn cute

When Sony first released the Aibo in 1999, the animatronic pup sold out within 20 minutes of its launch. Understandably. With its floppy-ish ears and well-timed tilts of the head, the robot passed for a beagle, albeit one that was made from silver plastic and didn’t poop.

Sony continued to sell the Aibo for several more years, incrementally improving on its technological dogginess until 2006, when Sony discontinued Aibo. Over a decade later, the robotic pup is back and for sale in the U.S. for the first time since 1999.

Robotic dogs lined upSony
All the generations of Aibo.
Human shaking hands with robot puppySony

The new generation of Aibo is greatly improved in terms of sheer dog-likeness. It’s like Aibo trotted into Pixar and emerged a full puppy dog-eyed robot. This time around the robot is connected to the cloud, where its behavior is dictated by constantly learning AI. According to Sony, the Aibo’s personality is formed by its interactions with its owner, like a walking, woofing Tamagotchi.

Robotic dog carrying toySony

Using its suite of internal sensors, the companion puppy will react to seasons and weather, learn new tricks, and use its nose camera (plus facial recognition) to seek out its owner. The robotic dog...

Give your business a name. Name your business something that indicates what you sell. This will come in handy later on, when you are marketing your business and want people to associate your business name with handmade furniture.
File a DBA, which stands for “doing business as,” at your local county clerk’s office. You may want to do a search to ensure that no other business in your town is operating under the same name. If you live in a large metropolitan area, a search is a necessity.
Create a line of furniture. You’ll need to have models of each piece of furniture that you intend to sell, so that customers can easily visualize what you have to offer. Add to your furniture line each year so that your stock stays fresh and on-trend.