The Custom Furniture Business: Creating Beautiful and Timeless Designs
Small businesses are the soul of America

More people are interested in buying locally made products than ever before. You can capitalize on many consumers’ return to local shopping by emphasizing that all components of your furniture are made in the United States, or in your town or area. The same applies to handmade goods. Individuals who are tired of mass-produced goods are often the same people who are interested in buying locally. Given this climate, it is a good time to start a handmade furniture business.

Catch a whiff of polluted cities in these geodesic domes

Pollution Pods by Michael Pinsky at Somerset House  for Earth Day 2018.

Behold, “Pollution Pods”

What does New Delhi smell like in the middle of a hot, sunny day? Not great, according to the artist Michael Pinksy. For his new project, Pollution Pods, Pinksy recreated the atmospheres of five cities—New Delhi, São Paulo, London, Beijing, and Tautra Island, Norway— and encapsulated them in transparent pods in the courtyard of London’s Somerset House.

Each pod reflects the city’s climate—for example, New Delhi is hot and hazy, Norway is cool and clear—and the smell of the air. Pinsky worked with scientists and scent specialists to recreate the smells, which they say are aren’t harmful beyond the sheer sensory unpleasantness of breathing in something like “Living Diesel,” London’s signature scent.

 Peter Macdiarmid for Somerset House
Pollution Pods by Michael Pinsky at Somerset House for Earth Day 2018.

Visitors wander through the geodesic pods, getting a feel (or rather, a smell) for what it’s like to live in a massively polluted city— or in the case of Tautra Island, a perfectly pristine environment. The piece, which was commissioned by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, is part of the Climate Project, which aims to use art...


Pollution Pods by Michael Pinsky at Somerset House  for Earth Day 2018.

Behold, “Pollution Pods”

What does New Delhi smell like in the middle of a hot, sunny day? Not great, according to the artist Michael Pinksy. For his new project, Pollution Pods, Pinksy recreated the atmospheres of five cities—New Delhi, São Paulo, London, Beijing, and Tautra Island, Norway— and encapsulated them in transparent pods in the courtyard of London’s Somerset House.

Each pod reflects the city’s climate—for example, New Delhi is hot and hazy, Norway is cool and clear—and the smell of the air. Pinsky worked with scientists and scent specialists to recreate the smells, which they say are aren’t harmful beyond the sheer sensory unpleasantness of breathing in something like “Living Diesel,” London’s signature scent.

 Peter Macdiarmid for Somerset House
Pollution Pods by Michael Pinsky at Somerset House for Earth Day 2018.

Visitors wander through the geodesic pods, getting a feel (or rather, a smell) for what it’s like to live in a massively polluted city— or in the case of Tautra Island, a perfectly pristine environment. The piece, which was commissioned by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, is part of the Climate Project, which aims to use art to change public perception around climate change.

Can Pollution Pods really inform visitors how real the environmental stakes are for cities around the world? At the very least, it’s a very good advertisement for booking a trip to Norway.

 Peter Macdiarmid for Somerset House
Pollution Pods by Michael Pinsky at Somerset House for Earth Day 2018.

Via: The Guardian

Pollution Pods by Michael Pinsky at Somerset House  for Earth Day 2018.

Behold, “Pollution Pods”

What does New Delhi smell like in the middle of a hot, sunny day? Not great, according to the artist Michael Pinksy. For his new project, Pollution Pods, Pinksy recreated the atmospheres of five cities—New Delhi, São Paulo, London, Beijing, and Tautra Island, Norway— and encapsulated them in transparent pods in the courtyard of London’s Somerset House.

Each pod reflects the city’s climate—for example, New Delhi is hot and hazy, Norway is cool and clear—and the smell of the air. Pinsky worked with scientists and scent specialists to recreate the smells, which they say are aren’t harmful beyond the sheer sensory unpleasantness of breathing in something like “Living Diesel,” London’s signature scent.

 Peter Macdiarmid for Somerset House
Pollution Pods by Michael Pinsky at Somerset House for Earth Day 2018.

Visitors wander through the geodesic pods, getting a feel (or rather, a smell) for what it’s like to live in a massively polluted city— or in the case of Tautra Island, a perfectly pristine environment. The piece, which was commissioned by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, is part of the Climate Project, which aims to use art to change public perception around climate change.

Can Pollution Pods really inform visitors how real the environmental stakes are for cities around the world? At the very least, it’s a very good advertisement for booking a trip to Norway.

 Peter Macdiarmid for Somerset House
Pollution Pods by Michael Pinsky at Somerset House for Earth Day 2018.

Via: The Guardian


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Give your business a name. Name your business something that indicates what you sell. This will come in handy later on, when you are marketing your business and want people to associate your business name with handmade furniture.
File a DBA, which stands for “doing business as,” at your local county clerk’s office. You may want to do a search to ensure that no other business in your town is operating under the same name. If you live in a large metropolitan area, a search is a necessity.
Create a line of furniture. You’ll need to have models of each piece of furniture that you intend to sell, so that customers can easily visualize what you have to offer. Add to your furniture line each year so that your stock stays fresh and on-trend.