The Custom Furniture Business: Creating Beautiful and Timeless Designs
Small businesses are the soul of America

More people are interested in buying locally made products than ever before. You can capitalize on many consumers’ return to local shopping by emphasizing that all components of your furniture are made in the United States, or in your town or area. The same applies to handmade goods. Individuals who are tired of mass-produced goods are often the same people who are interested in buying locally. Given this climate, it is a good time to start a handmade furniture business.

Magazine-worthy ’50s home wants $225K

The 1956 home was designed in conjunction with <em>Parents’</em> magazine for the 1956 Greater Houston Builder’s Association Parade of Homes.

Designed in conjunction with Parents’ magazine for the 1956 Greater Houston Builder’s Association Parade of Homes.

Have a nomination for a jaw-dropping listing that would make a mighty fine House of the Day? Get thee to the tipline and send us your suggestions. We’d love to see what you’ve got.

Location: Houston, Texas

Price: $225,000

This charming midcentury modern home in Glenbrook Valley, Houston, was designed by E. Kelly Gaffney in conjunction with Parents’ magazine for the 1956 Greater Houston Builder’s Association Parade of Homes. Recently renovated and restored, the 1,270-square-foot residence features three bedrooms, two baths, and many of the era’s architectural considerations.

Brick walls and a broadly pitched roof characterize the exteriors, while the interiors boast a soaring great room with tongue-and-groove beamed ceilings, clerestory windows, and an open floorplan. Here, a living room flows into a dining room and into a period kitchen, where green Formica countertops and what appears to be original cabinetry remain.

The bathrooms include original pink tiling in one and lemon yellow in the other, while hardwood floors are found throughout the house. The bedrooms...


The 1956 home was designed in conjunction with <em>Parents’</em> magazine for the 1956 Greater Houston Builder’s Association Parade of Homes.

Designed in conjunction with Parents’ magazine for the 1956 Greater Houston Builder’s Association Parade of Homes.

Have a nomination for a jaw-dropping listing that would make a mighty fine House of the Day? Get thee to the tipline and send us your suggestions. We’d love to see what you’ve got.

Location: Houston, Texas

Price: $225,000

This charming midcentury modern home in Glenbrook Valley, Houston, was designed by E. Kelly Gaffney in conjunction with Parents’ magazine for the 1956 Greater Houston Builder’s Association Parade of Homes. Recently renovated and restored, the 1,270-square-foot residence features three bedrooms, two baths, and many of the era’s architectural considerations.

Brick walls and a broadly pitched roof characterize the exteriors, while the interiors boast a soaring great room with tongue-and-groove beamed ceilings, clerestory windows, and an open floorplan. Here, a living room flows into a dining room and into a period kitchen, where green Formica countertops and what appears to be original cabinetry remain.

The bathrooms include original pink tiling in one and lemon yellow in the other, while hardwood floors are found throughout the house. The bedrooms are spacious, while a wooden deck and a generously sized backyard offer outdoor entertaining opportunities. Located at 7606 Cayton Street, it’s offered at $225,000.

Courtesy of Robert Searcy Properties

The 1956 home was designed in conjunction with <em>Parents’</em> magazine for the 1956 Greater Houston Builder’s Association Parade of Homes.

Designed in conjunction with Parents’ magazine for the 1956 Greater Houston Builder’s Association Parade of Homes.

Have a nomination for a jaw-dropping listing that would make a mighty fine House of the Day? Get thee to the tipline and send us your suggestions. We’d love to see what you’ve got.

Location: Houston, Texas

Price: $225,000

This charming midcentury modern home in Glenbrook Valley, Houston, was designed by E. Kelly Gaffney in conjunction with Parents’ magazine for the 1956 Greater Houston Builder’s Association Parade of Homes. Recently renovated and restored, the 1,270-square-foot residence features three bedrooms, two baths, and many of the era’s architectural considerations.

Brick walls and a broadly pitched roof characterize the exteriors, while the interiors boast a soaring great room with tongue-and-groove beamed ceilings, clerestory windows, and an open floorplan. Here, a living room flows into a dining room and into a period kitchen, where green Formica countertops and what appears to be original cabinetry remain.

The bathrooms include original pink tiling in one and lemon yellow in the other, while hardwood floors are found throughout the house. The bedrooms are spacious, while a wooden deck and a generously sized backyard offer outdoor entertaining opportunities. Located at 7606 Cayton Street, it’s offered at $225,000.

Courtesy of Robert Searcy Properties


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Give your business a name. Name your business something that indicates what you sell. This will come in handy later on, when you are marketing your business and want people to associate your business name with handmade furniture.
File a DBA, which stands for “doing business as,” at your local county clerk’s office. You may want to do a search to ensure that no other business in your town is operating under the same name. If you live in a large metropolitan area, a search is a necessity.
Create a line of furniture. You’ll need to have models of each piece of furniture that you intend to sell, so that customers can easily visualize what you have to offer. Add to your furniture line each year so that your stock stays fresh and on-trend.