The Custom Furniture Business: Creating Beautiful and Timeless Designs
Small businesses are the soul of America

More people are interested in buying locally made products than ever before. You can capitalize on many consumers’ return to local shopping by emphasizing that all components of your furniture are made in the United States, or in your town or area. The same applies to handmade goods. Individuals who are tired of mass-produced goods are often the same people who are interested in buying locally. Given this climate, it is a good time to start a handmade furniture business.

Kooky ’70s home on French island yours for $1.3M

The 1974 is an example of organic architecture.

The “organic” home was designed by Jean-Claude Mazet

This kooky home on the island of Corsica in France resembles an old submarine or antique diving helmet, given its porthole windows and protrusions. It was designed in 1974 in the organic style by Jean-Claude Mazet, a disciple and collaborator of Le Corbusier and a professor of architecture at Harvard University.

Rising on the side of a hill overlooking the Mediterranean Sea, the 155-square-meter (1,668 square feet) residence features a curving footprint as well as a large curving tower-like structure. Inside this double-height space is a sunken living area (or conversation pit) arranged around a swooping fireplace. A staircase leads from this area to a mezzanine seating area with views out toward the water.

Other flowing spaces abound, including a circular bathroom with an incredible purple-tiled in-ground tub. Three bedrooms, two baths, a garage, terraces, and expansive gardens “planted with numerous Mediterranean, African, and American varieties,” according to the listing, round out the orange-stucco property. To make this your holiday home, you’ll need 1.165 euros, or about $1.35 million. Below, a video tour of sorts.


The 1974 is an example of organic architecture.

The “organic” home was designed by Jean-Claude Mazet

This kooky home on the island of Corsica in France resembles an old submarine or antique diving helmet, given its porthole windows and protrusions. It was designed in 1974 in the organic style by Jean-Claude Mazet, a disciple and collaborator of Le Corbusier and a professor of architecture at Harvard University.

Rising on the side of a hill overlooking the Mediterranean Sea, the 155-square-meter (1,668 square feet) residence features a curving footprint as well as a large curving tower-like structure. Inside this double-height space is a sunken living area (or conversation pit) arranged around a swooping fireplace. A staircase leads from this area to a mezzanine seating area with views out toward the water.

Other flowing spaces abound, including a circular bathroom with an incredible purple-tiled in-ground tub. Three bedrooms, two baths, a garage, terraces, and expansive gardens “planted with numerous Mediterranean, African, and American varieties,” according to the listing, round out the orange-stucco property. To make this your holiday home, you’ll need 1.165 euros, or about $1.35 million. Below, a video tour of sorts.

Via: The Spaces

The 1974 is an example of organic architecture.

The “organic” home was designed by Jean-Claude Mazet

This kooky home on the island of Corsica in France resembles an old submarine or antique diving helmet, given its porthole windows and protrusions. It was designed in 1974 in the organic style by Jean-Claude Mazet, a disciple and collaborator of Le Corbusier and a professor of architecture at Harvard University.

Rising on the side of a hill overlooking the Mediterranean Sea, the 155-square-meter (1,668 square feet) residence features a curving footprint as well as a large curving tower-like structure. Inside this double-height space is a sunken living area (or conversation pit) arranged around a swooping fireplace. A staircase leads from this area to a mezzanine seating area with views out toward the water.

Other flowing spaces abound, including a circular bathroom with an incredible purple-tiled in-ground tub. Three bedrooms, two baths, a garage, terraces, and expansive gardens “planted with numerous Mediterranean, African, and American varieties,” according to the listing, round out the orange-stucco property. To make this your holiday home, you’ll need 1.165 euros, or about $1.35 million. Below, a video tour of sorts.

Via: The Spaces


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Give your business a name. Name your business something that indicates what you sell. This will come in handy later on, when you are marketing your business and want people to associate your business name with handmade furniture.
File a DBA, which stands for “doing business as,” at your local county clerk’s office. You may want to do a search to ensure that no other business in your town is operating under the same name. If you live in a large metropolitan area, a search is a necessity.
Create a line of furniture. You’ll need to have models of each piece of furniture that you intend to sell, so that customers can easily visualize what you have to offer. Add to your furniture line each year so that your stock stays fresh and on-trend.