The Custom Furniture Business: Creating Beautiful and Timeless Designs
Small businesses are the soul of America

More people are interested in buying locally made products than ever before. You can capitalize on many consumers’ return to local shopping by emphasizing that all components of your furniture are made in the United States, or in your town or area. The same applies to handmade goods. Individuals who are tired of mass-produced goods are often the same people who are interested in buying locally. Given this climate, it is a good time to start a handmade furniture business.

Modern farmhouse highlights glass and charred timber

This modern farmhouse features natural design elements that nod to the region’s agrarian history.

Very cozy

The farmhouse gets a fresh modern twist in this new single family home just outside of Columbus, Ohio, overlooking a ravine and situated amid rolling fields and forestry.

Designed by Jonathan Barnes Architecture and Design, the Sullivan House sits on a three-acre lot and takes cues from farm structures that have littered the landscape for the last two hundred years. But rather than settling for classic design, the architects instead opted to bring the home into the 21st century by blending minimalist form with natural materials.

 Photo by Brad Feinknopf via Dezeen
 Photo by Brad Feinknopf via Dezeen

Gabled roofs top off the two sections of this home, which sit perpendicularly and meet in the center, composing the 3,500 square feet that make up the property. The home features three bedrooms in the eastern wing, while living areas that include a fireplace, guest bedroom, and sleeping loft make up the western wing.

 Photo by Brad Feinknopf via Dezeen

In order to better marry the surrounding landscape with the house, floor-to-ceiling glass windows line the structure, and a terrace sits outside the living room. The interior boasts limestone walls and exposed...


This modern farmhouse features natural design elements that nod to the region’s agrarian history.

Very cozy

The farmhouse gets a fresh modern twist in this new single family home just outside of Columbus, Ohio, overlooking a ravine and situated amid rolling fields and forestry.

Designed by Jonathan Barnes Architecture and Design, the Sullivan House sits on a three-acre lot and takes cues from farm structures that have littered the landscape for the last two hundred years. But rather than settling for classic design, the architects instead opted to bring the home into the 21st century by blending minimalist form with natural materials.

 Photo by Brad Feinknopf via Dezeen
 Photo by Brad Feinknopf via Dezeen

Gabled roofs top off the two sections of this home, which sit perpendicularly and meet in the center, composing the 3,500 square feet that make up the property. The home features three bedrooms in the eastern wing, while living areas that include a fireplace, guest bedroom, and sleeping loft make up the western wing.

 Photo by Brad Feinknopf via Dezeen

In order to better marry the surrounding landscape with the house, floor-to-ceiling glass windows line the structure, and a terrace sits outside the living room. The interior boasts limestone walls and exposed wooden beams to add to the agrarian feel, while the exterior is clad in charred timber. Sitting just before a sprawling lawn and among clusters of trees, this house feels, well, right at home.

Via: Dezeen

This modern farmhouse features natural design elements that nod to the region’s agrarian history.

Very cozy

The farmhouse gets a fresh modern twist in this new single family home just outside of Columbus, Ohio, overlooking a ravine and situated amid rolling fields and forestry.

Designed by Jonathan Barnes Architecture and Design, the Sullivan House sits on a three-acre lot and takes cues from farm structures that have littered the landscape for the last two hundred years. But rather than settling for classic design, the architects instead opted to bring the home into the 21st century by blending minimalist form with natural materials.

 Photo by Brad Feinknopf via Dezeen
 Photo by Brad Feinknopf via Dezeen

Gabled roofs top off the two sections of this home, which sit perpendicularly and meet in the center, composing the 3,500 square feet that make up the property. The home features three bedrooms in the eastern wing, while living areas that include a fireplace, guest bedroom, and sleeping loft make up the western wing.

 Photo by Brad Feinknopf via Dezeen

In order to better marry the surrounding landscape with the house, floor-to-ceiling glass windows line the structure, and a terrace sits outside the living room. The interior boasts limestone walls and exposed wooden beams to add to the agrarian feel, while the exterior is clad in charred timber. Sitting just before a sprawling lawn and among clusters of trees, this house feels, well, right at home.

Via: Dezeen


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Give your business a name. Name your business something that indicates what you sell. This will come in handy later on, when you are marketing your business and want people to associate your business name with handmade furniture.
File a DBA, which stands for “doing business as,” at your local county clerk’s office. You may want to do a search to ensure that no other business in your town is operating under the same name. If you live in a large metropolitan area, a search is a necessity.
Create a line of furniture. You’ll need to have models of each piece of furniture that you intend to sell, so that customers can easily visualize what you have to offer. Add to your furniture line each year so that your stock stays fresh and on-trend.