The Custom Furniture Business: Creating Beautiful and Timeless Designs
Small businesses are the soul of America

More people are interested in buying locally made products than ever before. You can capitalize on many consumers’ return to local shopping by emphasizing that all components of your furniture are made in the United States, or in your town or area. The same applies to handmade goods. Individuals who are tired of mass-produced goods are often the same people who are interested in buying locally. Given this climate, it is a good time to start a handmade furniture business.

Our cities are getting hotter—and it’s killing people

Nighttime temperatures made higher by urban heat island effect can be more dangerous than daytime highs as they don’t allow the human body to cool down.

Extreme heat causes more deaths in U.S. cities than all other disasters combined

Among all the climate-related disasters that are confronting cities, heat waves are the deadliest. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, extreme heat now causes more deaths in U.S. cities than all other weather events combined. Longer, more frequent heat waves—like the one affecting most of the nation this week—are expected in the future, meaning summer’s death toll will rise.

Dozens of people have been killed across the U.S. and in Canada this week—including 28 people just in Montreal—after much of the country experienced multiple days that were 100 degrees Fahrenheit and higher. This weekend, California is expected to experience record-setting temperatures in places where wildfires are already burning.

Need proof of a changing climate? Look no further than this week’s heat wave. https://t.co/RTPf7p2bZC

— EDF (@EnvDefenseFund) July 5, 2018

Heat waves are especially deadly when nighttime temperatures don’t cool enough to offer urban residents relief. The human body isn’t able to recover from the effects of extreme heat if air temperatures don’t dip below 80 degrees...


Nighttime temperatures made higher by urban heat island effect can be more dangerous than daytime highs as they don’t allow the human body to cool down.

Extreme heat causes more deaths in U.S. cities than all other disasters combined

Among all the climate-related disasters that are confronting cities, heat waves are the deadliest. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, extreme heat now causes more deaths in U.S. cities than all other weather events combined. Longer, more frequent heat waves—like the one affecting most of the nation this week—are expected in the future, meaning summer’s death toll will rise.

Dozens of people have been killed across the U.S. and in Canada this week—including 28 people just in Montreal—after much of the country experienced multiple days that were 100 degrees Fahrenheit and higher. This weekend, California is expected to experience record-setting temperatures in places where wildfires are already burning.

Need proof of a changing climate? Look no further than this week’s heat wave. https://t.co/RTPf7p2bZC

— EDF (@EnvDefenseFund) July 5, 2018

Heat waves are especially deadly when nighttime temperatures don’t cool enough to offer urban residents relief. The human body isn’t able to recover from the effects of extreme heat if air temperatures don’t dip below 80 degrees Fahrenheit at night. That’s a bigger problem in cities, which retain their heat more than rural areas.

Not only are heat waves becoming more intense due to climate change, they’re occurring both earlier and later in the year, according to the National Resources Defense Council (NRDC).

A 2017 NRDC study looked at how an increase in the number of “dangerous summer days” will increase the number of heat-related deaths in 45 U.S. cities. An estimated 150 Americans will die every summer day due to extreme heat by 2040, with almost 30,000 heat-related deaths annually. That’s twice as many people who are killed by gun violence annually in the U.S. today.

Extreme heat puts a city’s most vulnerable residents at risk. Older adults are most likely to suffer heat-related illness due to existing chronic medical conditions, as are residents of disadvantaged communities who may not have access to air conditioning. Workers who are outdoors may experience “heat stress” which can contribute to accidental deaths.

Researchers have only recently begun to understand the effects of extreme heat on cities. In 2003, during a heat wave that swept Europe, 35,000 people were estimated to have died at the time. Now scientists believe the death toll is closer to 70,000.

The way cities are designed means that urban areas can be several degrees hotter than the surrounding region due to what’s known as heat island effect. This is why cities are prioritizing heat-related design changes in an effort to cool down cities.

A healthy urban canopy is among the most effective ways for cities to combat extreme heat, so cities are finding creative ways to expand their tree-planting efforts. In Los Angeles, a recent study by the Los Angeles Urban Cooling Collaborative found that an increase in tree canopy paired with programs to cover roofs and pavements with more reflective surfaces could reduce heat-related deaths citywide by more than 25 percent.

Nighttime temperatures made higher by urban heat island effect can be more dangerous than daytime highs as they don’t allow the human body to cool down.

Extreme heat causes more deaths in U.S. cities than all other disasters combined

Among all the climate-related disasters that are confronting cities, heat waves are the deadliest. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, extreme heat now causes more deaths in U.S. cities than all other weather events combined. Longer, more frequent heat waves—like the one affecting most of the nation this week—are expected in the future, meaning summer’s death toll will rise.

Dozens of people have been killed across the U.S. and in Canada this week—including 28 people just in Montreal—after much of the country experienced multiple days that were 100 degrees Fahrenheit and higher. This weekend, California is expected to experience record-setting temperatures in places where wildfires are already burning.

Need proof of a changing climate? Look no further than this week’s heat wave. https://t.co/RTPf7p2bZC

— EDF (@EnvDefenseFund) July 5, 2018

Heat waves are especially deadly when nighttime temperatures don’t cool enough to offer urban residents relief. The human body isn’t able to recover from the effects of extreme heat if air temperatures don’t dip below 80 degrees Fahrenheit at night. That’s a bigger problem in cities, which retain their heat more than rural areas.

Not only are heat waves becoming more intense due to climate change, they’re occurring both earlier and later in the year, according to the National Resources Defense Council (NRDC).

A 2017 NRDC study looked at how an increase in the number of “dangerous summer days” will increase the number of heat-related deaths in 45 U.S. cities. An estimated 150 Americans will die every summer day due to extreme heat by 2040, with almost 30,000 heat-related deaths annually. That’s twice as many people who are killed by gun violence annually in the U.S. today.

Extreme heat puts a city’s most vulnerable residents at risk. Older adults are most likely to suffer heat-related illness due to existing chronic medical conditions, as are residents of disadvantaged communities who may not have access to air conditioning. Workers who are outdoors may experience “heat stress” which can contribute to accidental deaths.

Researchers have only recently begun to understand the effects of extreme heat on cities. In 2003, during a heat wave that swept Europe, 35,000 people were estimated to have died at the time. Now scientists believe the death toll is closer to 70,000.

The way cities are designed means that urban areas can be several degrees hotter than the surrounding region due to what’s known as heat island effect. This is why cities are prioritizing heat-related design changes in an effort to cool down cities.

A healthy urban canopy is among the most effective ways for cities to combat extreme heat, so cities are finding creative ways to expand their tree-planting efforts. In Los Angeles, a recent study by the Los Angeles Urban Cooling Collaborative found that an increase in tree canopy paired with programs to cover roofs and pavements with more reflective surfaces could reduce heat-related deaths citywide by more than 25 percent.


Read full article on Blog


Give your business a name. Name your business something that indicates what you sell. This will come in handy later on, when you are marketing your business and want people to associate your business name with handmade furniture.
File a DBA, which stands for “doing business as,” at your local county clerk’s office. You may want to do a search to ensure that no other business in your town is operating under the same name. If you live in a large metropolitan area, a search is a necessity.
Create a line of furniture. You’ll need to have models of each piece of furniture that you intend to sell, so that customers can easily visualize what you have to offer. Add to your furniture line each year so that your stock stays fresh and on-trend.