The Custom Furniture Business: Creating Beautiful and Timeless Designs
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More people are interested in buying locally made products than ever before. You can capitalize on many consumers’ return to local shopping by emphasizing that all components of your furniture are made in the United States, or in your town or area. The same applies to handmade goods. Individuals who are tired of mass-produced goods are often the same people who are interested in buying locally. Given this climate, it is a good time to start a handmade furniture business.

Buckminster Fuller made fancy posters for his greatest inventions

Buckminster Fuller, <em>Geodesic Structures - Monohex</em>, 1981

The architect created the series of prints in the 1980s—now they’re on show and for sale

Throughout his career, the architect and engineer Buckminster Fuller worked to bring his wild ideas to the public. Some, like his utopian vision for Harlem, never came to fruition. Others, like his geodesic domes, have popped up in various forms around the world.

Screen print of round houseEdward Cella Art & Architecture
Buckminster Fuller, Dymaxion Dwelling House-Witchata House, From Inventions Portfolio, 1981

Many of his inventions got a real-world prototype, and all of them were the product of detailed line drawings that served as blueprints for his big ideas. In a new exhibition at the Edward Cella Art & Architecture gallery in Los Angeles, we can see how Fuller brought those two things together through a series of self-promotional posters he crafted near the end of his career with the help of Carl Solway Gallery.

Screenprint of Dymaxion CarEdward Cella Art & Architecture
R. Buckmister Fuller (1895-1983), Dymaxion Car, From Inventions Portfolio, 1981

The posters feature a photo of a Fuller invention—the Dymaxion Car, Geodesic Dome, and a Tensile-Integrity Structure, for example—overlaid with an illustration of the concept....


Buckminster Fuller, <em>Geodesic Structures - Monohex</em>, 1981

The architect created the series of prints in the 1980s—now they’re on show and for sale

Throughout his career, the architect and engineer Buckminster Fuller worked to bring his wild ideas to the public. Some, like his utopian vision for Harlem, never came to fruition. Others, like his geodesic domes, have popped up in various forms around the world.

Screen print of round houseEdward Cella Art & Architecture
Buckminster Fuller, Dymaxion Dwelling House-Witchata House, From Inventions Portfolio, 1981

Many of his inventions got a real-world prototype, and all of them were the product of detailed line drawings that served as blueprints for his big ideas. In a new exhibition at the Edward Cella Art & Architecture gallery in Los Angeles, we can see how Fuller brought those two things together through a series of self-promotional posters he crafted near the end of his career with the help of Carl Solway Gallery.

Screenprint of Dymaxion CarEdward Cella Art & Architecture
R. Buckmister Fuller (1895-1983), Dymaxion Car, From Inventions Portfolio, 1981

The posters feature a photo of a Fuller invention—the Dymaxion Car, Geodesic Dome, and a Tensile-Integrity Structure, for example—overlaid with an illustration of the concept. The blueprint illustrations are screen printed in white ink on a clear polyester film that can sit atop the photograph of the project, creating a multi-layered print that promotes the visions in a striking way.

Screen print of structure with blueprint overlayEdward Cella Art & Architecture
Buckmister Fuller, Synergetic Building Construction – Octetruss, From Inventions Portfolio, 1981.

That Fuller created these himself is notable. You can imagine that it was a way to prove that his ideas, as wild and structurally complicated as they might seem, were in some cases realized—and often to his original specifications.

The show will run from September 8 to November 3, during which the posters are available to purchase at $7,000 a piece.

Via: Fast Company

Buckminster Fuller, <em>Geodesic Structures - Monohex</em>, 1981

The architect created the series of prints in the 1980s—now they’re on show and for sale

Throughout his career, the architect and engineer Buckminster Fuller worked to bring his wild ideas to the public. Some, like his utopian vision for Harlem, never came to fruition. Others, like his geodesic domes, have popped up in various forms around the world.

Screen print of round houseEdward Cella Art & Architecture
Buckminster Fuller, Dymaxion Dwelling House-Witchata House, From Inventions Portfolio, 1981

Many of his inventions got a real-world prototype, and all of them were the product of detailed line drawings that served as blueprints for his big ideas. In a new exhibition at the Edward Cella Art & Architecture gallery in Los Angeles, we can see how Fuller brought those two things together through a series of self-promotional posters he crafted near the end of his career with the help of Carl Solway Gallery.

Screenprint of Dymaxion CarEdward Cella Art & Architecture
R. Buckmister Fuller (1895-1983), Dymaxion Car, From Inventions Portfolio, 1981

The posters feature a photo of a Fuller invention—the Dymaxion Car, Geodesic Dome, and a Tensile-Integrity Structure, for example—overlaid with an illustration of the concept. The blueprint illustrations are screen printed in white ink on a clear polyester film that can sit atop the photograph of the project, creating a multi-layered print that promotes the visions in a striking way.

Screen print of structure with blueprint overlayEdward Cella Art & Architecture
Buckmister Fuller, Synergetic Building Construction – Octetruss, From Inventions Portfolio, 1981.

That Fuller created these himself is notable. You can imagine that it was a way to prove that his ideas, as wild and structurally complicated as they might seem, were in some cases realized—and often to his original specifications.

The show will run from September 8 to November 3, during which the posters are available to purchase at $7,000 a piece.

Via: Fast Company


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Give your business a name. Name your business something that indicates what you sell. This will come in handy later on, when you are marketing your business and want people to associate your business name with handmade furniture.
File a DBA, which stands for “doing business as,” at your local county clerk’s office. You may want to do a search to ensure that no other business in your town is operating under the same name. If you live in a large metropolitan area, a search is a necessity.
Create a line of furniture. You’ll need to have models of each piece of furniture that you intend to sell, so that customers can easily visualize what you have to offer. Add to your furniture line each year so that your stock stays fresh and on-trend.