The Custom Furniture Business: Creating Beautiful and Timeless Designs
Small businesses are the soul of America

More people are interested in buying locally made products than ever before. You can capitalize on many consumers’ return to local shopping by emphasizing that all components of your furniture are made in the United States, or in your town or area. The same applies to handmade goods. Individuals who are tired of mass-produced goods are often the same people who are interested in buying locally. Given this climate, it is a good time to start a handmade furniture business.

Ikea’s new line of toys is perfectly off-kilter

Straight from the mind of a 7-year-old

Ikea’s newest collection is another notch in its maximalist belt. This time, though, instead of wild candlesticks and strange vases, it’s all about toys. The new Lustigt collection, available in U.S. stores in October, is a line of toys that Ikea says celebrates “play for the sake of playing.”

All of the toys in the collection have a perfectly off-kilter sense of fun. There’s an origami set and a light-up jump rope. A weaving loom and paint roller set encourages kids to get creative (even at the cost of a parent’s sanity).

The line also includes some nostalgic pieces like a dart game and a bright colored puzzle, but there are also a few functional pieces (like a bedspread and a seriously cool asymmetrical shelf that has a face built into it) as well as things in the mix that we’re not quite sure what to do with (like a giant stuff hand).

The whole collection feels as if it was born from a child’s imagination as opposed to a handful of adults sitting around a conference table brainstorming what a kid might like. And indeed, Ikea says that the 7-year-old daughter of designer Henrik Preutz had a hand in bringing the line to life.

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Straight from the mind of a 7-year-old

Ikea’s newest collection is another notch in its maximalist belt. This time, though, instead of wild candlesticks and strange vases, it’s all about toys. The new Lustigt collection, available in U.S. stores in October, is a line of toys that Ikea says celebrates “play for the sake of playing.”

All of the toys in the collection have a perfectly off-kilter sense of fun. There’s an origami set and a light-up jump rope. A weaving loom and paint roller set encourages kids to get creative (even at the cost of a parent’s sanity).

The line also includes some nostalgic pieces like a dart game and a bright colored puzzle, but there are also a few functional pieces (like a bedspread and a seriously cool asymmetrical shelf that has a face built into it) as well as things in the mix that we’re not quite sure what to do with (like a giant stuff hand).

The whole collection feels as if it was born from a child’s imagination as opposed to a handful of adults sitting around a conference table brainstorming what a kid might like. And indeed, Ikea says that the 7-year-old daughter of designer Henrik Preutz had a hand in bringing the line to life.

Straight from the mind of a 7-year-old

Ikea’s newest collection is another notch in its maximalist belt. This time, though, instead of wild candlesticks and strange vases, it’s all about toys. The new Lustigt collection, available in U.S. stores in October, is a line of toys that Ikea says celebrates “play for the sake of playing.”

All of the toys in the collection have a perfectly off-kilter sense of fun. There’s an origami set and a light-up jump rope. A weaving loom and paint roller set encourages kids to get creative (even at the cost of a parent’s sanity).

The line also includes some nostalgic pieces like a dart game and a bright colored puzzle, but there are also a few functional pieces (like a bedspread and a seriously cool asymmetrical shelf that has a face built into it) as well as things in the mix that we’re not quite sure what to do with (like a giant stuff hand).

The whole collection feels as if it was born from a child’s imagination as opposed to a handful of adults sitting around a conference table brainstorming what a kid might like. And indeed, Ikea says that the 7-year-old daughter of designer Henrik Preutz had a hand in bringing the line to life.


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Give your business a name. Name your business something that indicates what you sell. This will come in handy later on, when you are marketing your business and want people to associate your business name with handmade furniture.
File a DBA, which stands for “doing business as,” at your local county clerk’s office. You may want to do a search to ensure that no other business in your town is operating under the same name. If you live in a large metropolitan area, a search is a necessity.
Create a line of furniture. You’ll need to have models of each piece of furniture that you intend to sell, so that customers can easily visualize what you have to offer. Add to your furniture line each year so that your stock stays fresh and on-trend.