The Custom Furniture Business: Creating Beautiful and Timeless Designs
Small businesses are the soul of America

More people are interested in buying locally made products than ever before. You can capitalize on many consumers’ return to local shopping by emphasizing that all components of your furniture are made in the United States, or in your town or area. The same applies to handmade goods. Individuals who are tired of mass-produced goods are often the same people who are interested in buying locally. Given this climate, it is a good time to start a handmade furniture business.

French retirement home gets the millennial pink treatment

Not just for the youth anymore

Millennial pink, the color we all love to love (and love to hate), isn’t just for the youth anymore. At least if we’re to believe this beautiful and very pink retirement home in France.

Dominique Coulon & Associés, designer of inventive libraries, schools, and elder care centers created the Huningue retirement home with a single color palette: a peachy, pink hue just a touch warmer than the traditional millennial pink.

Stairwell with pink wallsEugeni Pons via The Spaces

This—let’s call it retirement pink—covers the interior of the main building, which is part of a 43,000-square-foot complex that also includes a restaurant, hobby workshop, vegetable garden, and place to play boule. The color is the result of mixing red concrete with pink terra cotta, which also gives the space a beautifully imperfect texture.

Exterior shot of brick and glass buildingEugeni Pons via The Spaces

Though the interior is clearly the attention grabber, the architects paid equal attention to the facade, which is a pleasing mix of materials—large glass windows interspersed with a woven brick pattern whose color is pretty close to retirement pink, too.

Via: The Spaces


Not just for the youth anymore

Millennial pink, the color we all love to love (and love to hate), isn’t just for the youth anymore. At least if we’re to believe this beautiful and very pink retirement home in France.

Dominique Coulon & Associés, designer of inventive libraries, schools, and elder care centers created the Huningue retirement home with a single color palette: a peachy, pink hue just a touch warmer than the traditional millennial pink.

Stairwell with pink wallsEugeni Pons via The Spaces

This—let’s call it retirement pink—covers the interior of the main building, which is part of a 43,000-square-foot complex that also includes a restaurant, hobby workshop, vegetable garden, and place to play boule. The color is the result of mixing red concrete with pink terra cotta, which also gives the space a beautifully imperfect texture.

Exterior shot of brick and glass buildingEugeni Pons via The Spaces

Though the interior is clearly the attention grabber, the architects paid equal attention to the facade, which is a pleasing mix of materials—large glass windows interspersed with a woven brick pattern whose color is pretty close to retirement pink, too.

Via: The Spaces

Not just for the youth anymore

Millennial pink, the color we all love to love (and love to hate), isn’t just for the youth anymore. At least if we’re to believe this beautiful and very pink retirement home in France.

Dominique Coulon & Associés, designer of inventive libraries, schools, and elder care centers created the Huningue retirement home with a single color palette: a peachy, pink hue just a touch warmer than the traditional millennial pink.

Stairwell with pink wallsEugeni Pons via The Spaces

This—let’s call it retirement pink—covers the interior of the main building, which is part of a 43,000-square-foot complex that also includes a restaurant, hobby workshop, vegetable garden, and place to play boule. The color is the result of mixing red concrete with pink terra cotta, which also gives the space a beautifully imperfect texture.

Exterior shot of brick and glass buildingEugeni Pons via The Spaces

Though the interior is clearly the attention grabber, the architects paid equal attention to the facade, which is a pleasing mix of materials—large glass windows interspersed with a woven brick pattern whose color is pretty close to retirement pink, too.

Via: The Spaces


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Give your business a name. Name your business something that indicates what you sell. This will come in handy later on, when you are marketing your business and want people to associate your business name with handmade furniture.
File a DBA, which stands for “doing business as,” at your local county clerk’s office. You may want to do a search to ensure that no other business in your town is operating under the same name. If you live in a large metropolitan area, a search is a necessity.
Create a line of furniture. You’ll need to have models of each piece of furniture that you intend to sell, so that customers can easily visualize what you have to offer. Add to your furniture line each year so that your stock stays fresh and on-trend.