The Custom Furniture Business: Creating Beautiful and Timeless Designs
Small businesses are the soul of America

More people are interested in buying locally made products than ever before. You can capitalize on many consumers’ return to local shopping by emphasizing that all components of your furniture are made in the United States, or in your town or area. The same applies to handmade goods. Individuals who are tired of mass-produced goods are often the same people who are interested in buying locally. Given this climate, it is a good time to start a handmade furniture business.

Gorgeous renovation turns old steam factory into modern office space

Another win for adaptive reuse

As an architectural trend, it’s hard to hate on adaptive reuse. The catch-all term for giving an old building a new purpose allows original architecture to anchor a neighborhood, while breathing new life into an otherwise unused building. There are plenty of examples of clever architectural reuse—the most recent among them is a steam plant turned local non-profit headquarters.

In Toledo, Ohio, HKS transformed a 124,000 square foot plant into a new office building for ProMedica, a growing medical company whose offices had been spread throughout the city. The architects retained the facade of the brick factory for the most part, preserving three of the brick exteriors and the two steam towers that soar into the sky, while adding windows to one of building’s facades.

The interior is outfitted with concrete floors and high ceilings, which allow for a central atrium for employees to gather and hold meetings. In addition to the factory, the architects renovated a brutalist building from 1981 to expand the headquarters’ footprint. The campus, which is situated in the city’s downtown, aims to revive the business district without ignoring the city’s...


Another win for adaptive reuse

As an architectural trend, it’s hard to hate on adaptive reuse. The catch-all term for giving an old building a new purpose allows original architecture to anchor a neighborhood, while breathing new life into an otherwise unused building. There are plenty of examples of clever architectural reuse—the most recent among them is a steam plant turned local non-profit headquarters.

In Toledo, Ohio, HKS transformed a 124,000 square foot plant into a new office building for ProMedica, a growing medical company whose offices had been spread throughout the city. The architects retained the facade of the brick factory for the most part, preserving three of the brick exteriors and the two steam towers that soar into the sky, while adding windows to one of building’s facades.

The interior is outfitted with concrete floors and high ceilings, which allow for a central atrium for employees to gather and hold meetings. In addition to the factory, the architects renovated a brutalist building from 1981 to expand the headquarters’ footprint. The campus, which is situated in the city’s downtown, aims to revive the business district without ignoring the city’s industrial past.

Via: Dezeen

Another win for adaptive reuse

As an architectural trend, it’s hard to hate on adaptive reuse. The catch-all term for giving an old building a new purpose allows original architecture to anchor a neighborhood, while breathing new life into an otherwise unused building. There are plenty of examples of clever architectural reuse—the most recent among them is a steam plant turned local non-profit headquarters.

In Toledo, Ohio, HKS transformed a 124,000 square foot plant into a new office building for ProMedica, a growing medical company whose offices had been spread throughout the city. The architects retained the facade of the brick factory for the most part, preserving three of the brick exteriors and the two steam towers that soar into the sky, while adding windows to one of building’s facades.

The interior is outfitted with concrete floors and high ceilings, which allow for a central atrium for employees to gather and hold meetings. In addition to the factory, the architects renovated a brutalist building from 1981 to expand the headquarters’ footprint. The campus, which is situated in the city’s downtown, aims to revive the business district without ignoring the city’s industrial past.

Via: Dezeen


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Give your business a name. Name your business something that indicates what you sell. This will come in handy later on, when you are marketing your business and want people to associate your business name with handmade furniture.
File a DBA, which stands for “doing business as,” at your local county clerk’s office. You may want to do a search to ensure that no other business in your town is operating under the same name. If you live in a large metropolitan area, a search is a necessity.
Create a line of furniture. You’ll need to have models of each piece of furniture that you intend to sell, so that customers can easily visualize what you have to offer. Add to your furniture line each year so that your stock stays fresh and on-trend.