The Custom Furniture Business: Creating Beautiful and Timeless Designs
Small businesses are the soul of America

More people are interested in buying locally made products than ever before. You can capitalize on many consumers’ return to local shopping by emphasizing that all components of your furniture are made in the United States, or in your town or area. The same applies to handmade goods. Individuals who are tired of mass-produced goods are often the same people who are interested in buying locally. Given this climate, it is a good time to start a handmade furniture business.

Blocky concrete home hides an airy second level

The “basement” gets plenty of sunlight

Here at Curbed, we appreciate a well-designed concrete home, and this Tel Aviv house is no exception. Designed by Israeli architect Asaf Gottesman with help from Tel Aviv firm GSArch, the Postscript House is Gottesman’s first residential project in more than a decade and he made up for lost time with a stunner of a residence that’s deceptively simple.

Designed for a family with four children, the Postscript House is equal parts practical and ingenious. The architects built the house into the landscape’s gentle slope, which allowed them to play with perspective. From the west, the house appears to be a single floor. Viewed from the east, it reveals a second lower story that looks out onto the garden.

Concrete house with pink trees in frontPhoto by Omri Amsalem courtesy Gottesman Architecture
Dining room with glowing lightPhoto by Omri Amsalem courtesy Gottesman Architecture

The home unfolds on two levels, with the main floor playing host to the living room and master bedroom. Downstairs, each of the kids gets a bedroom suite that looks out onto the garden.

Living room sofaPhoto by Omri Amsalem courtesy Gottesman Architecture

The architects kept the house intentionally minimal with a stark light interior that...


The “basement” gets plenty of sunlight

Here at Curbed, we appreciate a well-designed concrete home, and this Tel Aviv house is no exception. Designed by Israeli architect Asaf Gottesman with help from Tel Aviv firm GSArch, the Postscript House is Gottesman’s first residential project in more than a decade and he made up for lost time with a stunner of a residence that’s deceptively simple.

Designed for a family with four children, the Postscript House is equal parts practical and ingenious. The architects built the house into the landscape’s gentle slope, which allowed them to play with perspective. From the west, the house appears to be a single floor. Viewed from the east, it reveals a second lower story that looks out onto the garden.

Concrete house with pink trees in frontPhoto by Omri Amsalem courtesy Gottesman Architecture
Dining room with glowing lightPhoto by Omri Amsalem courtesy Gottesman Architecture

The home unfolds on two levels, with the main floor playing host to the living room and master bedroom. Downstairs, each of the kids gets a bedroom suite that looks out onto the garden.

Living room sofaPhoto by Omri Amsalem courtesy Gottesman Architecture

The architects kept the house intentionally minimal with a stark light interior that complements the blunt facade. Gottesman says the house is meant to reflect its owners’ style, which he describes as “informal” but “clutter-free.” Now that’s an aesthetic we can get behind.

Bedroom that overlooks poolPhoto by Omri Amsalem courtesy Gottesman Architecture

The “basement” gets plenty of sunlight

Here at Curbed, we appreciate a well-designed concrete home, and this Tel Aviv house is no exception. Designed by Israeli architect Asaf Gottesman with help from Tel Aviv firm GSArch, the Postscript House is Gottesman’s first residential project in more than a decade and he made up for lost time with a stunner of a residence that’s deceptively simple.

Designed for a family with four children, the Postscript House is equal parts practical and ingenious. The architects built the house into the landscape’s gentle slope, which allowed them to play with perspective. From the west, the house appears to be a single floor. Viewed from the east, it reveals a second lower story that looks out onto the garden.

Concrete house with pink trees in frontPhoto by Omri Amsalem courtesy Gottesman Architecture
Dining room with glowing lightPhoto by Omri Amsalem courtesy Gottesman Architecture

The home unfolds on two levels, with the main floor playing host to the living room and master bedroom. Downstairs, each of the kids gets a bedroom suite that looks out onto the garden.

Living room sofaPhoto by Omri Amsalem courtesy Gottesman Architecture

The architects kept the house intentionally minimal with a stark light interior that complements the blunt facade. Gottesman says the house is meant to reflect its owners’ style, which he describes as “informal” but “clutter-free.” Now that’s an aesthetic we can get behind.

Bedroom that overlooks poolPhoto by Omri Amsalem courtesy Gottesman Architecture

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Give your business a name. Name your business something that indicates what you sell. This will come in handy later on, when you are marketing your business and want people to associate your business name with handmade furniture.
File a DBA, which stands for “doing business as,” at your local county clerk’s office. You may want to do a search to ensure that no other business in your town is operating under the same name. If you live in a large metropolitan area, a search is a necessity.
Create a line of furniture. You’ll need to have models of each piece of furniture that you intend to sell, so that customers can easily visualize what you have to offer. Add to your furniture line each year so that your stock stays fresh and on-trend.