The Custom Furniture Business: Creating Beautiful and Timeless Designs
Small businesses are the soul of America

More people are interested in buying locally made products than ever before. You can capitalize on many consumers’ return to local shopping by emphasizing that all components of your furniture are made in the United States, or in your town or area. The same applies to handmade goods. Individuals who are tired of mass-produced goods are often the same people who are interested in buying locally. Given this climate, it is a good time to start a handmade furniture business.

Black timber house is small but efficient

Each room has a connection to the outdoors

This vacation home in The Netherlands embraces the best of two trends—the 807-square-foot house is clad in charred timber, making it a dream tiny(ish) home for anyone with a taste for Shou Sugi Ban.

Black timber house on lakePhoto by Ewout Huibers via ArchDaily

Designed by the Dutch architect Chris Collaris and interiors firm i29, the house with a compact footprint of 592 square feet sits on the shore of a lake just south of Amsterdam. The family’s directive was to build a small, efficient home that still took full advantage of the lakeside views.

Living room with concrete floorsPhoto by Ewout Huibers via ArchDaily

The designers divided the house into four rectangular modules—living room, dining/kitchen, three bedrooms, and a bathroom—and designed each with an eye to the details.

Kitchen flowing into patioPhoto by Ewout Huibers via ArchDaily

The rooms feature custom-built cabinets, closets, and media consoles that make the most of the limited space. Each module has a sliding door or window that opens completely to the outside, expanding the home’s footprint by merging the interior with the outdoors.

Courtyard leading to interior roomPhoto by Ewout Huibers via ArchDaily

When it’s all said and done, the house is just a couple hundred...


Each room has a connection to the outdoors

This vacation home in The Netherlands embraces the best of two trends—the 807-square-foot house is clad in charred timber, making it a dream tiny(ish) home for anyone with a taste for Shou Sugi Ban.

Black timber house on lakePhoto by Ewout Huibers via ArchDaily

Designed by the Dutch architect Chris Collaris and interiors firm i29, the house with a compact footprint of 592 square feet sits on the shore of a lake just south of Amsterdam. The family’s directive was to build a small, efficient home that still took full advantage of the lakeside views.

Living room with concrete floorsPhoto by Ewout Huibers via ArchDaily

The designers divided the house into four rectangular modules—living room, dining/kitchen, three bedrooms, and a bathroom—and designed each with an eye to the details.

Kitchen flowing into patioPhoto by Ewout Huibers via ArchDaily

The rooms feature custom-built cabinets, closets, and media consoles that make the most of the limited space. Each module has a sliding door or window that opens completely to the outside, expanding the home’s footprint by merging the interior with the outdoors.

Courtyard leading to interior roomPhoto by Ewout Huibers via ArchDaily

When it’s all said and done, the house is just a couple hundred square feet larger than the typical tiny home, but it feels optimized for non-tiny living. See more photos this way.

Via: ArchDaily

Each room has a connection to the outdoors

This vacation home in The Netherlands embraces the best of two trends—the 807-square-foot house is clad in charred timber, making it a dream tiny(ish) home for anyone with a taste for Shou Sugi Ban.

Black timber house on lakePhoto by Ewout Huibers via ArchDaily

Designed by the Dutch architect Chris Collaris and interiors firm i29, the house with a compact footprint of 592 square feet sits on the shore of a lake just south of Amsterdam. The family’s directive was to build a small, efficient home that still took full advantage of the lakeside views.

Living room with concrete floorsPhoto by Ewout Huibers via ArchDaily

The designers divided the house into four rectangular modules—living room, dining/kitchen, three bedrooms, and a bathroom—and designed each with an eye to the details.

Kitchen flowing into patioPhoto by Ewout Huibers via ArchDaily

The rooms feature custom-built cabinets, closets, and media consoles that make the most of the limited space. Each module has a sliding door or window that opens completely to the outside, expanding the home’s footprint by merging the interior with the outdoors.

Courtyard leading to interior roomPhoto by Ewout Huibers via ArchDaily

When it’s all said and done, the house is just a couple hundred square feet larger than the typical tiny home, but it feels optimized for non-tiny living. See more photos this way.

Via: ArchDaily


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Give your business a name. Name your business something that indicates what you sell. This will come in handy later on, when you are marketing your business and want people to associate your business name with handmade furniture.
File a DBA, which stands for “doing business as,” at your local county clerk’s office. You may want to do a search to ensure that no other business in your town is operating under the same name. If you live in a large metropolitan area, a search is a necessity.
Create a line of furniture. You’ll need to have models of each piece of furniture that you intend to sell, so that customers can easily visualize what you have to offer. Add to your furniture line each year so that your stock stays fresh and on-trend.