The Custom Furniture Business: Creating Beautiful and Timeless Designs
Small businesses are the soul of America

More people are interested in buying locally made products than ever before. You can capitalize on many consumers’ return to local shopping by emphasizing that all components of your furniture are made in the United States, or in your town or area. The same applies to handmade goods. Individuals who are tired of mass-produced goods are often the same people who are interested in buying locally. Given this climate, it is a good time to start a handmade furniture business.

Renovation turns ’60s Airstream into dreamy modern office

Complete with Wi-Fi

This renovated Bambi II Airstream is a modern California dream. Designed for a tech entrepreneur who wanted to balance screen time with outdoor time, the trailer is now a slick mobile office that is extremely Silicon Valley.

Edmonds + Lee Architects renovated the 1960s trailer, giving it shiny white-painted aluminum walls that bounce the California sunlight throughout the interior. The small space is outfitted with pale wood cabinets and lots of counter space.

On one end is cushioned banquet seating that hugs a Eero Saarinen Tulip table. On the other end, naturally, there’s an adjustable desk that doubles as a standing desk and a platform for an air mattress.

The trailer is powered by solar, propane, gas, and AGM batteries. It has Wi-Fi and a cellular network booster, so its owner can log on even when he’s out of range. This is an office, after all.

Interior of modern AirstreamPhoto: Joe Fletcher/Edmonds + Lee Architects
Bed on platformPhoto: Joe Fletcher/Edmonds + Lee Architects
Gray cushion seats around Tulip tablePhoto: Joe Fletcher/Edmonds + Lee Architects
 Photo: Joe Fletcher/Edmonds + Lee Architects


Complete with Wi-Fi

This renovated Bambi II Airstream is a modern California dream. Designed for a tech entrepreneur who wanted to balance screen time with outdoor time, the trailer is now a slick mobile office that is extremely Silicon Valley.

Edmonds + Lee Architects renovated the 1960s trailer, giving it shiny white-painted aluminum walls that bounce the California sunlight throughout the interior. The small space is outfitted with pale wood cabinets and lots of counter space.

On one end is cushioned banquet seating that hugs a Eero Saarinen Tulip table. On the other end, naturally, there’s an adjustable desk that doubles as a standing desk and a platform for an air mattress.

The trailer is powered by solar, propane, gas, and AGM batteries. It has Wi-Fi and a cellular network booster, so its owner can log on even when he’s out of range. This is an office, after all.

Interior of modern AirstreamPhoto: Joe Fletcher/Edmonds + Lee Architects
Bed on platformPhoto: Joe Fletcher/Edmonds + Lee Architects
Gray cushion seats around Tulip tablePhoto: Joe Fletcher/Edmonds + Lee Architects
 Photo: Joe Fletcher/Edmonds + Lee Architects

Complete with Wi-Fi

This renovated Bambi II Airstream is a modern California dream. Designed for a tech entrepreneur who wanted to balance screen time with outdoor time, the trailer is now a slick mobile office that is extremely Silicon Valley.

Edmonds + Lee Architects renovated the 1960s trailer, giving it shiny white-painted aluminum walls that bounce the California sunlight throughout the interior. The small space is outfitted with pale wood cabinets and lots of counter space.

On one end is cushioned banquet seating that hugs a Eero Saarinen Tulip table. On the other end, naturally, there’s an adjustable desk that doubles as a standing desk and a platform for an air mattress.

The trailer is powered by solar, propane, gas, and AGM batteries. It has Wi-Fi and a cellular network booster, so its owner can log on even when he’s out of range. This is an office, after all.

Interior of modern AirstreamPhoto: Joe Fletcher/Edmonds + Lee Architects
Bed on platformPhoto: Joe Fletcher/Edmonds + Lee Architects
Gray cushion seats around Tulip tablePhoto: Joe Fletcher/Edmonds + Lee Architects
 Photo: Joe Fletcher/Edmonds + Lee Architects


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Give your business a name. Name your business something that indicates what you sell. This will come in handy later on, when you are marketing your business and want people to associate your business name with handmade furniture.
File a DBA, which stands for “doing business as,” at your local county clerk’s office. You may want to do a search to ensure that no other business in your town is operating under the same name. If you live in a large metropolitan area, a search is a necessity.
Create a line of furniture. You’ll need to have models of each piece of furniture that you intend to sell, so that customers can easily visualize what you have to offer. Add to your furniture line each year so that your stock stays fresh and on-trend.