The Custom Furniture Business: Creating Beautiful and Timeless Designs
Small businesses are the soul of America

More people are interested in buying locally made products than ever before. You can capitalize on many consumers’ return to local shopping by emphasizing that all components of your furniture are made in the United States, or in your town or area. The same applies to handmade goods. Individuals who are tired of mass-produced goods are often the same people who are interested in buying locally. Given this climate, it is a good time to start a handmade furniture business.

7 yurts for the ultimate glamping vacation

The yurt village at Snow Mountain Ranch in Colorado.

Yurts—a type of tent—provide all the benefits of camping without the hassle

Thanks to the tiny house movement, yurts have gone from a quirky rarity in the U.S. to an increasingly practical, sustainable, and value-friendly choice. Rooted in the history of Mongolian and Turkic shelters, yurts today stem from the 1960s and 1970s when yurt-pioneer Bill Coperthwaite looked to indigenous Mongolian design to build round, dome-like structures in the American west.

Since then, yurts have grown in popularity as easy-to-assemble, easy-to-maintain shelter. Circular in shape, yurts are usually tent-like structures with a collapsible lattice framework. They often function off the grid, although some have amenities like bathrooms and showers, and others have luxurious bedding and furniture. While you'll find plenty in the backcountry that cater to skiers and snowboarders on hut trips, there are also a surprising number of yurts being lived in full time or used as nightly rentals for vacationers.

For many, yurts offer all the fun of camping outdoors without the hassle (think leaky tents, cold nights, and uncomfortable bedding). From a remote oceanside yurt in Alaska to a family-friendly yurt...


The yurt village at Snow Mountain Ranch in Colorado.

Yurts—a type of tent—provide all the benefits of camping without the hassle

Thanks to the tiny house movement, yurts have gone from a quirky rarity in the U.S. to an increasingly practical, sustainable, and value-friendly choice. Rooted in the history of Mongolian and Turkic shelters, yurts today stem from the 1960s and 1970s when yurt-pioneer Bill Coperthwaite looked to indigenous Mongolian design to build round, dome-like structures in the American west.

Since then, yurts have grown in popularity as easy-to-assemble, easy-to-maintain shelter. Circular in shape, yurts are usually tent-like structures with a collapsible lattice framework. They often function off the grid, although some have amenities like bathrooms and showers, and others have luxurious bedding and furniture. While you'll find plenty in the backcountry that cater to skiers and snowboarders on hut trips, there are also a surprising number of yurts being lived in full time or used as nightly rentals for vacationers.

For many, yurts offer all the fun of camping outdoors without the hassle (think leaky tents, cold nights, and uncomfortable bedding). From a remote oceanside yurt in Alaska to a family-friendly yurt village in Colorado, we’ve rounded up seven yurts perfect for your next vacation.

 HomeAway
A garden yurt available for nightly rentals in New York.

Garden yurt in New York

This custom-designed yurt south of Ithaca, New York, boasts an organic vegetable and flower garden amidst towering trees. Guests enjoy an eat-in kitchen (complete with complimentary chocolate and coffee), stone patio, fire pit, and beds for 6. The yurt is also located near the Van Burkirk Gorge and its many waterfalls. Rates start at $182 per night.

 Photo by Nick Simonite, courtesy of El Cosmico
A yurt available for rent in El Cosmico.

El Cosmico in Texas

Set on the high plains desert of Marfa, Texas, El Cosmico is a hub of all things glamping; the lodging outpost features luxury tents, trailers, and tepees. But El Cosmico also boast a 22-foot in diameter yurt with wooden floors and a queen bed. There’s air conditioning, heat, a desk and sofa for lounging, and high-end linens. Rates start at $79 per night.

 Courtesy of YMCA of the Rockies
The yurt village at Snow Mountain Ranch in Colorado.

Snow Mountain Ranch in Colorado

Not far from Winter Park, Colorado, the yurt village at Snow Mountain Ranch provides family-friendly accommodations with a bucketful of amenities. Each yurt sleeps 6 people with one queen bed and two bunked beds. Outside, an extra tent pad sits next to a fire pit, grill, and picnic table.

And while you’ll love the brand new bathhouse with flush toilets and showers, the yurt village’s location on the campus of the YMCA of the Rockies allows access to a plethora of top-notch activities. Kids and parents alike can enjoy rock climbing, a summer tubing hill, zip lining, archery, and an indoor pool. Rates start at $99 per night.

 Courtesy of Zion Backcountry Glamping

Rustic Yurt in Utah

Located near Zion National Park, this rustic yurt can accommodate up to nine people on four double beds and three single beds. You have to bring your own food and there’s no running water, but the views and top-notch access to hiking make up for the yurt’s simplicity. There is a flushing toilet and hot water for showers in a separate bathhouse. Rates start at $210.

 Shearwater Cove
An oceanfront yurt available for rent in Alaska.

Shearwater Cove in Alaska

Set 10 miles by water from Seward, Alaska, this oceanfront yurt is an ideal retreat away from it all. The four-person yurt comes outfitted with running water, a cooler, cooking supplies, a composting toilet, and a hot shower. But be ready for the isolated location; there are no roads to the yurt so visitors spend their time hiking trails, swimming, or using the included sea kayaks to explore the coastline of the Kenai Fjords. Rates start at $520 per night for two to four people and include a roundtrip boat transfer from Seward and use of the property’s sea kayaks.

 Blue Green Rentals
The two-bedroom luxury yurts available at Shenandoah Crossing.

Shenandoah Crossing in Virginia

The yurts at the Shenandoah Crossing resort in Virginia are set on 1,000 acres of rolling hills and filled to the brim with luxurious touches. Guests can expect four-poster beds, plush linens, flat-screen TVs, bathrooms, fully-equipped kitchens, and central heat and air. You’ll also have access to plenty of on-site activities like horse rides, hiking, swimming, and crafts. Rates start at $129 per night.

 Courtesy of Treebones Resort
The yurt village at Treebones Resort in Big Sur.

Treebones Resort in California

Big Sur, California, is world-renowned as a picturesque oceanfront town, and the region has bounced back since storms in 2017 ravaged and closed Highway 1 in both directions.

Make your vacation even more memorable with a crowd-free stay at the yurts at Treebones Resort. With ocean views, king and queen size beds, and plush linens, these yurts come with everything you need to relax. And the best parts are right outside your door—redwood view decks, Adirondack chairs, and the fresh sea air. Rates start at $320 per night.

The yurt village at Snow Mountain Ranch in Colorado.

Yurts—a type of tent—provide all the benefits of camping without the hassle

Thanks to the tiny house movement, yurts have gone from a quirky rarity in the U.S. to an increasingly practical, sustainable, and value-friendly choice. Rooted in the history of Mongolian and Turkic shelters, yurts today stem from the 1960s and 1970s when yurt-pioneer Bill Coperthwaite looked to indigenous Mongolian design to build round, dome-like structures in the American west.

Since then, yurts have grown in popularity as easy-to-assemble, easy-to-maintain shelter. Circular in shape, yurts are usually tent-like structures with a collapsible lattice framework. They often function off the grid, although some have amenities like bathrooms and showers, and others have luxurious bedding and furniture. While you'll find plenty in the backcountry that cater to skiers and snowboarders on hut trips, there are also a surprising number of yurts being lived in full time or used as nightly rentals for vacationers.

For many, yurts offer all the fun of camping outdoors without the hassle (think leaky tents, cold nights, and uncomfortable bedding). From a remote oceanside yurt in Alaska to a family-friendly yurt village in Colorado, we’ve rounded up seven yurts perfect for your next vacation.

 HomeAway
A garden yurt available for nightly rentals in New York.

Garden yurt in New York

This custom-designed yurt south of Ithaca, New York, boasts an organic vegetable and flower garden amidst towering trees. Guests enjoy an eat-in kitchen (complete with complimentary chocolate and coffee), stone patio, fire pit, and beds for 6. The yurt is also located near the Van Burkirk Gorge and its many waterfalls. Rates start at $182 per night.

 Photo by Nick Simonite, courtesy of El Cosmico
A yurt available for rent in El Cosmico.

El Cosmico in Texas

Set on the high plains desert of Marfa, Texas, El Cosmico is a hub of all things glamping; the lodging outpost features luxury tents, trailers, and tepees. But El Cosmico also boast a 22-foot in diameter yurt with wooden floors and a queen bed. There’s air conditioning, heat, a desk and sofa for lounging, and high-end linens. Rates start at $79 per night.

 Courtesy of YMCA of the Rockies
The yurt village at Snow Mountain Ranch in Colorado.

Snow Mountain Ranch in Colorado

Not far from Winter Park, Colorado, the yurt village at Snow Mountain Ranch provides family-friendly accommodations with a bucketful of amenities. Each yurt sleeps 6 people with one queen bed and two bunked beds. Outside, an extra tent pad sits next to a fire pit, grill, and picnic table.

And while you’ll love the brand new bathhouse with flush toilets and showers, the yurt village’s location on the campus of the YMCA of the Rockies allows access to a plethora of top-notch activities. Kids and parents alike can enjoy rock climbing, a summer tubing hill, zip lining, archery, and an indoor pool. Rates start at $99 per night.

 Courtesy of Zion Backcountry Glamping

Rustic Yurt in Utah

Located near Zion National Park, this rustic yurt can accommodate up to nine people on four double beds and three single beds. You have to bring your own food and there’s no running water, but the views and top-notch access to hiking make up for the yurt’s simplicity. There is a flushing toilet and hot water for showers in a separate bathhouse. Rates start at $210.

 Shearwater Cove
An oceanfront yurt available for rent in Alaska.

Shearwater Cove in Alaska

Set 10 miles by water from Seward, Alaska, this oceanfront yurt is an ideal retreat away from it all. The four-person yurt comes outfitted with running water, a cooler, cooking supplies, a composting toilet, and a hot shower. But be ready for the isolated location; there are no roads to the yurt so visitors spend their time hiking trails, swimming, or using the included sea kayaks to explore the coastline of the Kenai Fjords. Rates start at $520 per night for two to four people and include a roundtrip boat transfer from Seward and use of the property’s sea kayaks.

 Blue Green Rentals
The two-bedroom luxury yurts available at Shenandoah Crossing.

Shenandoah Crossing in Virginia

The yurts at the Shenandoah Crossing resort in Virginia are set on 1,000 acres of rolling hills and filled to the brim with luxurious touches. Guests can expect four-poster beds, plush linens, flat-screen TVs, bathrooms, fully-equipped kitchens, and central heat and air. You’ll also have access to plenty of on-site activities like horse rides, hiking, swimming, and crafts. Rates start at $129 per night.

 Courtesy of Treebones Resort
The yurt village at Treebones Resort in Big Sur.

Treebones Resort in California

Big Sur, California, is world-renowned as a picturesque oceanfront town, and the region has bounced back since storms in 2017 ravaged and closed Highway 1 in both directions.

Make your vacation even more memorable with a crowd-free stay at the yurts at Treebones Resort. With ocean views, king and queen size beds, and plush linens, these yurts come with everything you need to relax. And the best parts are right outside your door—redwood view decks, Adirondack chairs, and the fresh sea air. Rates start at $320 per night.


Read full article on Blog


Give your business a name. Name your business something that indicates what you sell. This will come in handy later on, when you are marketing your business and want people to associate your business name with handmade furniture.
File a DBA, which stands for “doing business as,” at your local county clerk’s office. You may want to do a search to ensure that no other business in your town is operating under the same name. If you live in a large metropolitan area, a search is a necessity.
Create a line of furniture. You’ll need to have models of each piece of furniture that you intend to sell, so that customers can easily visualize what you have to offer. Add to your furniture line each year so that your stock stays fresh and on-trend.