The Custom Furniture Business: Creating Beautiful and Timeless Designs
Small businesses are the soul of America

More people are interested in buying locally made products than ever before. You can capitalize on many consumers’ return to local shopping by emphasizing that all components of your furniture are made in the United States, or in your town or area. The same applies to handmade goods. Individuals who are tired of mass-produced goods are often the same people who are interested in buying locally. Given this climate, it is a good time to start a handmade furniture business.

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Living in a home isn’t always straightforward. There are landlords to negotiate with over repairs, rent increases, and security deposits; the daily nuances of sharing space with roommates and neighbors; and the dozens of practical questions that arise when buying, selling, renting, and cleaning a house or apartment.

In House Rules, Curbed’s advice column, writer Briallen Hopper tackles these topics and more—and she’s taking your questions! Please send us your roommate conundrums, your tricky landlord situations, your moving quandaries, and other dilemmas by filling out this form. (All letter-writers will be kept anonymous.)


Here’s how to ask

Living in a home isn’t always straightforward. There are landlords to negotiate with over repairs, rent increases, and security deposits; the daily nuances of sharing space with roommates and neighbors; and the dozens of practical questions that arise when buying, selling, renting, and cleaning a house or apartment.

In House Rules, Curbed’s advice column, writer Briallen Hopper tackles these topics and more—and she’s taking your questions! Please send us your roommate conundrums, your tricky landlord situations, your moving quandaries, and other dilemmas by filling out this form. (All letter-writers will be kept anonymous.)

Here’s how to ask

Living in a home isn’t always straightforward. There are landlords to negotiate with over repairs, rent increases, and security deposits; the daily nuances of sharing space with roommates and neighbors; and the dozens of practical questions that arise when buying, selling, renting, and cleaning a house or apartment.

In House Rules, Curbed’s advice column, writer Briallen Hopper tackles these topics and more—and she’s taking your questions! Please send us your roommate conundrums, your tricky landlord situations, your moving quandaries, and other dilemmas by filling out this form. (All letter-writers will be kept anonymous.)


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Give your business a name. Name your business something that indicates what you sell. This will come in handy later on, when you are marketing your business and want people to associate your business name with handmade furniture.
File a DBA, which stands for “doing business as,” at your local county clerk’s office. You may want to do a search to ensure that no other business in your town is operating under the same name. If you live in a large metropolitan area, a search is a necessity.
Create a line of furniture. You’ll need to have models of each piece of furniture that you intend to sell, so that customers can easily visualize what you have to offer. Add to your furniture line each year so that your stock stays fresh and on-trend.