The Custom Furniture Business: Creating Beautiful and Timeless Designs
Small businesses are the soul of America

More people are interested in buying locally made products than ever before. You can capitalize on many consumers’ return to local shopping by emphasizing that all components of your furniture are made in the United States, or in your town or area. The same applies to handmade goods. Individuals who are tired of mass-produced goods are often the same people who are interested in buying locally. Given this climate, it is a good time to start a handmade furniture business.

Memo Admonishes 30 Park Place Residents Not to Be “Less Than Kind” When Asked to Mask Up

A high rise in Manhattan at 30 Park Place, with blue sky in the background and trees framing the photo. Nicole Beauchamp/Flickr

Some Four Seasons apartment-dwellers have reportedly been giving the staff a hard time.

The Four Seasons Private Residences at 30 Park Place is one of the swankiest condo residences downtown. The 82nd-floor, 4,538-square-foot apartment that has claimed to be the highest terraced penthouse in all of Manhattan was originally listed at $30 million. In September, a four-bedroom on the 56th floor sold for $6.65 million, and a three-bedroom on the 51st floor sold for $5.45 million, according to city records. But the international buyers and finance bros who live in these apartments don’t like being told what to do — especially, say, Mask up, please! Cover your nose, too — and, judging by a recent memo, they have been taking it out on the staff.

On September 7, the management sent an email to all residents, warning them that their access privileges to the 38th-floor gym would be temporarily revoked if they failed to abide by new COVID safety protocols. “We have had a couple of instances in the past week where patrons have had to be reminded by our team of the rules (especially the Masks and Screening) and the response has been less than kind,” the email,...


A high rise in Manhattan at 30 Park Place, with blue sky in the background and trees framing the photo. Nicole Beauchamp/Flickr

Some Four Seasons apartment-dwellers have reportedly been giving the staff a hard time.

The Four Seasons Private Residences at 30 Park Place is one of the swankiest condo residences downtown. The 82nd-floor, 4,538-square-foot apartment that has claimed to be the highest terraced penthouse in all of Manhattan was originally listed at $30 million. In September, a four-bedroom on the 56th floor sold for $6.65 million, and a three-bedroom on the 51st floor sold for $5.45 million, according to city records. But the international buyers and finance bros who live in these apartments don’t like being told what to do — especially, say, Mask up, please! Cover your nose, too — and, judging by a recent memo, they have been taking it out on the staff.

On September 7, the management sent an email to all residents, warning them that their access privileges to the 38th-floor gym would be temporarily revoked if they failed to abide by new COVID safety protocols. “We have had a couple of instances in the past week where patrons have had to be reminded by our team of the rules (especially the Masks and Screening) and the response has been less than kind,” the email, obtained by Curbed, reads. “I would like to ask everyone to please be respectful to our team members, and to each other.”

The email also reminded residents that, due to a five-person-occupancy limit, personal trainers and guests are not allowed in the gym. “The team is there for your health and safety and are responsible for helping to ensure that we are in full compliance with the current guidelines,” it continues. “We ask that you please follow them for the benefit of everyone in the Community. Individuals who continue to disregard the rules may have their access privileges temporarily removed.”

On Thursday — a few hours after 100 protesters clustered on the corner of Broadway and Park Place to demand a blanket eviction moratorium — three residents of 30 Park Place confirmed to Curbed that they had received the email. All said that most occupants have been observing mask rules, but one told us on condition of anonymity that there are still some who outright refuse or wear them slung under their chins and generally seem to have no “regard for anyone but themselves.”

“I hadn’t seen anything since they sent the email,” the resident said. “Then today, I was walking in behind another guy who wasn’t wearing one, and the doorman basically begged him to put one on, and he flicked him away dismissively.” Curbed saw dozens of people enter and exit the building over the course of about three hours on Thursday, and all of them were masked except for one, who walked directly into a waiting Town Car.

A high rise in Manhattan at 30 Park Place, with blue sky in the background and trees framing the photo. Nicole Beauchamp/Flickr

Some Four Seasons apartment-dwellers have reportedly been giving the staff a hard time.

The Four Seasons Private Residences at 30 Park Place is one of the swankiest condo residences downtown. The 82nd-floor, 4,538-square-foot apartment that has claimed to be the highest terraced penthouse in all of Manhattan was originally listed at $30 million. In September, a four-bedroom on the 56th floor sold for $6.65 million, and a three-bedroom on the 51st floor sold for $5.45 million, according to city records. But the international buyers and finance bros who live in these apartments don’t like being told what to do — especially, say, Mask up, please! Cover your nose, too — and, judging by a recent memo, they have been taking it out on the staff.

On September 7, the management sent an email to all residents, warning them that their access privileges to the 38th-floor gym would be temporarily revoked if they failed to abide by new COVID safety protocols. “We have had a couple of instances in the past week where patrons have had to be reminded by our team of the rules (especially the Masks and Screening) and the response has been less than kind,” the email, obtained by Curbed, reads. “I would like to ask everyone to please be respectful to our team members, and to each other.”

The email also reminded residents that, due to a five-person-occupancy limit, personal trainers and guests are not allowed in the gym. “The team is there for your health and safety and are responsible for helping to ensure that we are in full compliance with the current guidelines,” it continues. “We ask that you please follow them for the benefit of everyone in the Community. Individuals who continue to disregard the rules may have their access privileges temporarily removed.”

On Thursday — a few hours after 100 protesters clustered on the corner of Broadway and Park Place to demand a blanket eviction moratorium — three residents of 30 Park Place confirmed to Curbed that they had received the email. All said that most occupants have been observing mask rules, but one told us on condition of anonymity that there are still some who outright refuse or wear them slung under their chins and generally seem to have no “regard for anyone but themselves.”

“I hadn’t seen anything since they sent the email,” the resident said. “Then today, I was walking in behind another guy who wasn’t wearing one, and the doorman basically begged him to put one on, and he flicked him away dismissively.” Curbed saw dozens of people enter and exit the building over the course of about three hours on Thursday, and all of them were masked except for one, who walked directly into a waiting Town Car.


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Give your business a name. Name your business something that indicates what you sell. This will come in handy later on, when you are marketing your business and want people to associate your business name with handmade furniture.
File a DBA, which stands for “doing business as,” at your local county clerk’s office. You may want to do a search to ensure that no other business in your town is operating under the same name. If you live in a large metropolitan area, a search is a necessity.
Create a line of furniture. You’ll need to have models of each piece of furniture that you intend to sell, so that customers can easily visualize what you have to offer. Add to your furniture line each year so that your stock stays fresh and on-trend.